2012 medicine Nobel honors research on reprogramming adult cells | Science News

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2012 medicine Nobel honors research on reprogramming adult cells

John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka share this year's prize

By
6:10am, October 8, 2012

Two scientists who showed that a cell's fate is reversible have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The Nobel committee announced October 8 that John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka are being honored for showing that cells once thought to be locked into a specific identity could remember and revert to the supremely flexible state they have in an early embryo.

Gurdon’s work, published in 1962, forever changed the view that adult cells are stuck in their fate. In a series of experiments, he transplanted the nucleus — the cellular compartment that contains DNA — from an intestinal cell of an adult frog into a frog egg cell from which the nucleus

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