A little air pollution boosts vegetation’s carbon uptake | Science News

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A little air pollution boosts vegetation’s carbon uptake

Aerosols bumped up world’s plant productivity by 25 percent in the 1960s and 1970s, new research suggests

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1:41pm, April 22, 2009

The world’s vegetation soaked up carbon dioxide more efficiently under the polluted skies of recent decades than it would have under a pristine atmosphere, a new analysis in the April 23 Nature suggests. The trend hints that relying on forests and other vegetation to sequester carbon may not be effective if skies continue to clear, researchers say.

Major volcanic eruptions throw large quantities of aerosols, such as small bits of fractured rock and droplets of sulfuric acid, high into the atmosphere. Those particles scatter incoming solar ra

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