Some animals’ internal clocks follow a different drummer | Science News

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Some animals’ internal clocks follow a different drummer

Weird circadian rhythms keep organisms in time with their environments

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1:00pm, July 14, 2015
17-year cicada

TAKING ITS TIME  Circadian clocks in some animals tick-tock to a different beat, like this member of brood II, one of the 17-year cicada species that emerged in 2013.

Circadian clocks, which reset about every 24 hours, are common in organisms living on Earth’s surface. They control sleeping and eating patterns, the rise and fall of body temperature and blood pressure, hormone release and many other important body processes. But the clocks in some animals tick-tock to a different beat.

Lunar clock

Along with its circadian clock, a marine worm called Platynereis dumerilii has a timer set to the moon, which controls when the animals spawn. No one has discovered yet which protein gears drive this lunar clock. But experiments have demonstrated that the
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