Erin Wayman

Erin Wayman

Managing Editor, Magazine

Erin Wayman became Science News’ production editor in 2013 after a year of reporting on earth and environmental sciences for the magazine. A former primatologist-in-training, Erin decided to leave monkey-watching behind after a close run-in with angry peccaries in Ecuador. Once she completed her master’s degree in biological anthropology at the University of California, Davis, she switched careers and earned a master’s in science writing at Johns Hopkins University. Erin was previously an associate editor at EARTH and an assistant editor at Smithsonian magazine, where she blogged about human evolution. Her work has also appeared in New Scientist, Slate, ScienceNOW and Current Anthropology.

All Stories by Erin Wayman

  1. Life

    The Monkey’s Voyage

    By 26 million years ago, the ancestors of today’s New World monkeys had arrived in South America. How those primates reached the continent is something of a conundrum.

  2. Planetary Science

    Year in Review: Methane shortage on Mars

    A trace of the gas is not enough to be a sign of life.

  3. Climate

    Year in Review: Carbon dioxide levels pass milestone

    Although scientists are confident about humankind’s role in climate change, they still have a lot to learn about the magnitude and timing of future climate shifts.

  4. Earth

    Cryovolcano

    An ice volcano that erupts slurries of volatile compounds such as water or methane instead of lava.

  5. Humans

    The Accidental Species

  6. Humans

    The last common ancestor of humans and chimps probably wasn’t much like either

  7. Shanghai smog
    Climate

    Slashing greenhouse gas emissions could save millions of lives

    Simulations suggest reduced air pollution would improve public health.

  8. Environment

    Cool Idea

  9. Planetary Science

    Mars rover fails to find methane

    A dearth of the gas in the Red Planet's atmosphere disappoints scientists looking for signs of biological activity.

  10. Earth

    Hot spot deep beneath North America could have triggered quakes

    Mantle plume might have left trail of hot rock under continental US.

  11. Earth

    Buried Saharan rivers might have been early expressways

    Humans might have migrated across the arid region along three once-lush waterways.

  12. Climate

    No more Superstorm Sandys expected for a long time

    Future conditions less likely to steer hurricanes directly into the East Coast, analysis suggests.