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Science News

Janet Raloff

Editor, Science News for Students

Editor Janet Raloff has been reporting at Science News for more than three decades on the environment, energy, science policy, agriculture and nutrition. She was among the first to give national visibility to such issues as electromagnetic pulse weaponry and hormone-mimicking pollutants, and was the first anywhere to report on the widespread tainting of streams and groundwater sources with pharmaceuticals. Her writing has won awards from the National Association of Science Writers, International Free Press Association and the Institute of Food Technologists. Over the years, Janet has been an occasional commentator on NPR's "Living on Earth" and her work has appeared in several dozen publications. She is also a founding board member of the Society of Environmental Journalists. Before joining Science News, Janet was managing editor of Energy Research Reports (outside Boston), a staff writer at Chemistry (an American Chemical Society magazine) and a writer/editor for Chicago's Adler Planetarium. Initially an astronomy major, she earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University (with an elective major in physics). She interned with the Office of Cancer Communications (NIH), Argonne National Laboratory, the Oak Ridger in Tennessee and the Rock Hill Evening Herald in North Carolina.

Janet Raloff's Articles

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    Food for Thought

    Star Wars Goes Organic

    A group promoting organic foods has produced its own version of Star Wars, featuring heroic produce, villainous eggs and bananas, and warnings about dangerous agricultural practices.
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  • 
    Food for Thought

    Bread and Chocolate, No Longer D-Minimus

    Heavy fortification of foods with vitamin D offers one way to overcome chronic deficiencies of the nutrient among many people and can even help build bone.
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  • News

    Zinc boosts kids' learning

    Zinc fortification improved mental skills in children with normal healthy diets, suggesting that the recommended intake for this mineral may need to be raised.
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    Food for Thought

    Season Affects Cancer-Surgery Survival

    Ample vitamin D at the time of lung-cancer surgery dramatically increases the odds that a patient will be alive and cancerfree 5 years later.
  • News

    Obesity may aggravate flu

    At least in mice, obesity can greatly exaggerate the severity of flu by impairing the body's immune response.
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    Food for Thought

    Is Chromium in Your Mineral Supplement?

    As a new study on chromium illustrates, the value of a mineral supplement can depend greatly on which chemical form of the mineral a manufacturer uses.