Laurel Hamers

Staff Writer

Laurel is the general assignment reporter at Science News. She holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Williams College and a graduate certificate in science communication from the University of California-Santa Cruz. Before coming to Science News, she covered the intersection of physical and life sciences at the American Institute of Physics. Her work has also appeared in ScienceMongabay, and the San Jose Mercury News.

All Stories by Laurel Hamers

  1. Aedes aegypti mosquito
    Animals

    Bacterial compounds may be as good as DEET at repelling mosquitoes

    A bacterium’s metabolic by-products are as effective as DEET in deterring Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

  2. NRAO
    Science & Society

    Here’s how the record-breaking government shutdown is disrupting science

    The partial government shutdown is taking many U.S. scientists out of commission and putting up hurdles to their research.

  3. hand holding poop sample cup
    Health & Medicine

    Studies can be in vitro, in vivo and now ‘in fimo’ — in poop

    Scientists have coined a new term — “in fimo” — to describe studies focused on feces.

  4. discarded fishing gear
    Environment

    4 ways to tackle ocean trash besides Ocean Cleanup’s broken system

    Here are three approaches to reducing ocean pollution that might be more effective than a controversial plan to fish trash out of the Pacific.

  5. animal feedlots
    Environment

    Satellites make mapping hot spots of ammonia pollution easier

    There’s a more accurate way to estimate ammonia emissions.

  6. Lassa virus
    Health & Medicine

    DNA tests of Lassa virus mid-outbreak helped Nigeria target its response

    New technology for analyzing genetic data quickly in the field guided how Nigeria dealt with an outbreak of Lassa fever in 2018.

  7. a composite photo showing steak before and after rotting
    Anthropology

    This scientist watches meat rot to decipher the Neandertal diet

    This scientist is studying how meat changes as it rots to figure out what Neandertals might have eaten.

  8. conifer fossil
    Paleontology

    More plants survived the world’s greatest mass extinction than thought

    Fossil plants from Jordan reveal more plant lineages that made it through the Great Dying roughly 252 million years ago.

  9. Gert-Jan Oskam walking with crutches
    Neuroscience

    Zapping the spinal cord helped paralyzed people learn to move again

    A handful of people paralyzed from spinal cord injuries have learned to walk again.

  10. northern Australian bettong
    Animals

    Endangered northern bettongs aren’t picky truffle eaters

    Without the northern bettong, the variety of Australia’s truffle-producing fungi could take a hit, a new study finds.

  11. traffic
    Climate

    Global carbon dioxide emissions will hit a record high in 2018

    Carbon dioxide emissions from China, the United States and India all rose this year, a new report finds.

  12. gecko on water
    Animals

    Here’s how geckos (almost) walk on water

    New high-speed video reveals how geckos use a hybrid walking-swimming gait in water to reach speeds similar to those on land.