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Guest Writer

Sarah Zielinski

Wild Things blogger

Sarah Zielinski is an award-winning science writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering a wide breadth of science, from astronomy to zoology. She founded and wrote Smithsonian’s Surprising Science blog and started Wild Things on her own website in early 2013 before moving it to its new home. Sarah’s work has been published in a variety of outlets, including Slate, Smithsonian, Science, Science News, National Geographic News and NPR.org.

Sarah Zielinski's Articles

  • 
    Wild Things

    It’s hard being a sea otter mom

    The energy requirements of lactation may explain why some female sea otters abandon their young.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Deadly bat disease gets easier to diagnose

    White-nose syndrome in bats can be spotted with UV light, scientists have found.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Bird dropping disguise proves to be effective camouflage

    Several species of spiders and other animals mimic bird poop.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Beware the pregnant scorpion

    Female striped bark scorpions are pregnant most of the time. That makes them fat, slow and really mean.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Dusk heralds a feeding frenzy in the waters off Oahu

    Even dolphins benefit when layers of organisms in the water column overlap for a short period.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Otters provide a lesson about the effects of dams

    A dam created a new habitat, but that habitat’s lower quality kept otter density low.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Island life prompts evolution of larger plant seeds

    In 40 species of plants, the island versions of seeds were larger than mainland counterparts, perhaps to keep the seeds from being lost at sea.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Mice really do like to run in wheels

    When scientists stuck a tiny wheel out in nature, wild mice ran just as much as their captive counterparts do.

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