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Guest Writer

Sarah Zielinski

Wild Things blogger

Sarah Zielinski is an award-winning science writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering a wide breadth of science, from astronomy to zoology. She founded and wrote Smithsonian’s Surprising Science blog and started Wild Things on her own website in early 2013 before moving it to its new home. Sarah’s work has been published in a variety of outlets, including Slate, Smithsonian, Science, Science News, National Geographic News and NPR.org.

Sarah Zielinski's Articles

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    Wild Things

    There’s plenty of bling in the natural world

    Beetles that look like solid gold are just the start to jewel-like and metallic looks in nature.

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    Wild Things

    Amphibian diseases flow through animal trade

    Discovery of chytrid fungus and ranaviruses in frogs and toads exported from Hong Kong shows how pathogens may spread.

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    Wild Things

    Spotted seals hear well in and out of water

    Spotted seals, native to the northern parts of the Pacific, hear frequencies that may mean they are susceptible to the effects of anthropogenic noise.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Australian flowers bloom red because of honeyeaters

    Many flowering plants converged on similar a color to attract the common birds.

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    Wild Things

    Algal blooms created ancient whale graveyard

    Whales and other marine mammals died at sea and were buried on a tidal flat in what's now in the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    The mystery of the missing fish heads

    When scientists opened up the stomachs of shortfin mako sharks, they found that nearly all of the digesting fish had no heads or tails.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    We’re only noticing the snowy owls

    A lemming boom last summer probably led to rises in populations of several predator species.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Fish lose their fear on a denuded reef

    Juvenile damselfish lose their ability to smell danger when in a degraded habitat.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    Secret feather flaps help a falcon control its dive

    The pop-up feathers of a falcon act similar to flaps on an airplane’s wing.

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  • 
    Wild Things

    It doesn’t always take wings to fly high

    Microbes, bees, termites and geese have been clocked at high altitudes, where air density and oxygen are low.

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