Sid Perkins | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Contact me
 
Guest Writer

Sid Perkins

Sid Perkins is a freelance science writer based in Crossville, Tenn.

Sid Perkins' Articles

  • Feature

    Dust, the Thermostat

    Analyses suggest that dust has profound, complex, and far-reaching effects on the planet's climate.
  • News

    Quantum physics explains core anomaly

    Scientists have used the principles of quantum physics to answer the long-standing puzzle of why seismic waves travel at different speeds in different directions across Earth's inner core.
  • News

    Himalayas may be due for big temblors

    Scientists say that a narrow region that rims the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau could be the spawning grounds for large earthquakes that could threaten millions in southern Asia in the decades to come.
  • News

    Scientists spy sixth undersea-vent ecology

    A new group of hydrothermal vents found in the Indian Ocean are populated by communities of organisms that differ significantly from other such groups of vent systems.
  • News

    Antarctic sediments muddy climate debate

    Ocean-floor sediments drilled from Antarctic regions recently covered by ice shelves suggest that those shelves were much younger than scientists had previously thought.
  • News

    New fossil sheds light on dinosaurs' diet

    Vestiges of soft tissue preserved in a 70-million-year-old Mongolian fossil suggest that some dinosaurs could have strained small bits of food from the water and mud of streams and ponds, just like some modern aquatic birds do.
  • News

    Completing a titan by getting a head

    When paleontologists unearthed the skeleton of a 70-million-year-old titanosaur in Madagascar in the late 1990s, they also recovered something that had been missing from previous such finds: a skull that matched the body.
  • News

    L.A. moves, but not in the way expected

    Researchers monitoring small ground motions along faults in Southern California ended up detecting an altogether different phenomenon: the rise and fall of the ground as local governments pump billions of gallons of water into and out of the region's aquifers.