Howdy, Neighbors: Long-term study finds a batch of red dwarfs | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.


News

Howdy, Neighbors: Long-term study finds a batch of red dwarfs

By
10:15am, November 29, 2006

The galactic neighborhood just got more crowded. Astronomers have found 20 previously unknown star systems that lie within 33 light-years of Earth. All the stars are faint, low-mass objects called red dwarfs, which rank among the most prevalent stars in the Milky Way.

The team discovered the star systems—2 triplets, 3 pairs, and 15 single stars—using a telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory near La Serena, Chile. Since 1999, the astronomers have been monitoring hundreds of stars, looking for motions indicating that some might lie close to the solar system.

Todd Henry of Georgia State University in Atlanta and his colleagues describe their find

This article is only available to Science News subscribers. Already a subscriber? Log in now. Or subscribe today for full access.

Get Science News headlines by e-mail.

More from Science News

From the Nature Index Paid Content