Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

Search Content

E.g., 06/29/2017
E.g., 06/29/2017
Your search has returned 5192 images:
  • IBM quantum computer
  • male cockatoo
Your search has returned 109221 articles:
  • Feature

    Quantum computers are about to get real

    Although the term “quantum computer” might suggest a miniature, sleek device, the latest incarnations are a far cry from anything available in the Apple Store. In a laboratory just 60 kilometers north of New York City, scientists are running a fledgling quantum computer through its paces — and the whole package looks like something that might be found in a dark corner of a basement. The...

    06/29/2017 - 07:00 Quantum Physics, Computing
  • News

    Getting a flu ‘shot’ could soon be as easy as sticking on a Band-Aid

    DIY vaccination may be on its way. In the first test in adults, a Band-Aid‒like patch studded with dissolving microneedles safely and effectively delivered a dose of influenza vaccine.

    People using the patch had a similar immune response to the flu vaccine as those who received a typical flu shot, researchers report online June 27 in the Lancet. And nearly all of the patch users...

    06/28/2017 - 16:30 Biomedicine, Health, Clinical Trials
  • News in Brief

    Male cockatoos have the beat

    View the video

    Like 1980s hair bands, male cockatoos woo females with flamboyant tresses and killer drum solos.

    Male palm cockatoos (Probosciger aterrimus) in northern Australia refashion sticks and seedpods into tools that the animals use to bang against trees as part of an elaborate visual and auditory display designed to seduce females. These beats aren’t random, but truly...

    06/28/2017 - 14:45 Animals, Ecology
  • News in Brief

    Gecko-inspired robot grippers could grab hold of space junk

    Get a grip. A new robotic gripping tool based on gecko feet can grab hold of floating objects in microgravity. The grippers could one day help robots move dangerous space junk to safer orbits or climb around the outside of space stations.

    Most strategies for sticking don’t work in space. Chemical adhesives can’t withstand the wide range of temperatures, and suction doesn’t work in a...

    06/28/2017 - 14:08 Robotics, Astronomy, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Carved human skulls found at ancient worship center in Turkey

    Hunter-gatherers who built and worshiped at one of the oldest known ritual centers in the world carved up human skulls in a style all their own.

    At Turkey’s Göbekli Tepe site — where human activity dates to between around 11,600 and 10,000 years ago — people cut deep grooves in three human skulls and drilled a hole in at least one of them, say archaeologist Julia Gresky of the German...

    06/28/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Chronic flu patients could be an early warning system for future outbreaks

    People with weakened immune systems might help scientists get a jump on the flu virus.

    Some flu virus mutations popped up again and again in cancer patients with long-term infections, researchers report June 27 in eLife. And some of those mutations were the same as ones found in flu viruses circulating around the world a few years later, evolutionary virologist Jesse Bloom of the Fred...

    06/27/2017 - 16:46 Microbiology, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    Floral curve test shows what’s great for a moth is not so good for a flower

    PORTLAND, ORE. — A great flower shape for a moth trying to get a drink in the dark turns out to be awful from the plant’s point of view.

    Offering hawk moths (Manduca sexta) a range of 3-D printed flowers with different curvatures shows that a moderately curved trumpet shape lets moths sip most efficiently, Foen Peng reported June 24 at the Evolution 2017 meeting. That’s a win for a...

    06/27/2017 - 10:00 Plants, Evolution, Animals
  • Wild Things

    Drowned wildebeests can feed a river ecosystem for years

    More than a million wildebeests migrate each year from Tanzania to Kenya and back again, following the rains and abundant grass that springs up afterward. Their path takes them across the Mara River, and some of the crossings are so dangerous that hundreds or thousands of wildebeests drown as they try to traverse the waterway.

    Those animals provide a brief, free buffet for crocodiles and...

    06/27/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Ecology
  • News

    Battering storms caused Antarctic sea ice to shrink at record pace

    View the video

    Unusually severe storms in 2016 wrought the quickest meltdown of Antarctic sea ice ever seen during a Southern Hemisphere spring. This could explain why Antarctica’s sea ice extent hit a record low earlier this year.

    Satellite images show that the extent of Antarctic sea ice decreased by an average of 75,000 square kilometers — almost the area of South...

    06/27/2017 - 07:00 Earth, Climate
  • Science & the Public

    Latest stats are just a start in preventing gun injuries in kids

    On June 18, 4-year-old Bentley Thomas Koch fatally shot himself in the face. A few weeks earlier, Harmony Warfield, age 7, was shot and killed by her 2-year-old cousin. And teens Shadi Najjar and Artem Ziberov, both on the eve of graduating from high school, died in a hail of gunfire. Stories like these of kids dying from gunshot wounds are devastating, but, sadly, they aren’t an anomaly.

    ...
    06/26/2017 - 10:00 Science & Society, Health