Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Search Content

E.g., 09/18/2018
E.g., 09/18/2018
Your search has returned 33 images:
  • Germanium
  • illustration of supernova 1987A
  • supernova simulation
Your search has returned 35 articles:
  • Germanium computer chips gain ground on silicon — again

    First germanium integrated circuits

    Integrated circuits made of germanium instead of silicon have been reported … by researchers at International Business Machines Corp. Even though the experimental devices are about three times as large as the smallest silicon circuits, they reportedly offer faster overall switching speed. Germanium … has inherently greater mobility than silicon,...

    02/09/2017 - 11:00 Materials, Computing
  • Editor's Note

    Supernova story continues, just like science journalism

    Some stories are just too good to let go. Ian Shelton first spotted supernova 1987A on the evening of Monday, February 23, 1987. A notice announcing the discovery appeared in the issue of Science News that went to the printer that Wednesday — and articles followed in each of the next three issues, with more than a dozen stories about the stellar explosion over the course of the year...
    02/08/2017 - 12:45 Astronomy
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers respond to antibiotics, carbon bonds and more

    Power struggle

    Ninety percent of people who believe that they are allergic to penicillin are not, Emily DeMarco reported in “Most penicillin allergies are off base” (SN: 12/24/16 & 1/7/17, p. 5). A recent study found that testing for penicillin allergies reduced by 34 percent the use of vancomycin, described in the story as “a powerful, last-resort antibiotic.”

    Reader Robin...

    02/08/2017 - 12:42 Health, Chemistry
  • Science Visualized

    Observers caught these stars going supernova

    In A.D. 185, Chinese records note the appearance of a “guest star” that then faded away over the span of several months. In 1572, astronomer Tycho Brahe and many others watched as a previously unknown star in the constellation Cassiopeia blasted out gobs of light and then eventually disappeared. And 30 years ago, the world witnessed a similar blaze of light from a small galaxy that orbits the...

    02/08/2017 - 11:47 Astronomy
  • Feature

    When a nearby star goes supernova, scientists will be ready

    Almost every night that the constellation Orion is visible, physicist Mark Vagins steps outside to peer at a reddish star at the right shoulder of the mythical figure. “You can see the color of Betelgeuse with the naked eye. It’s very striking, this red, red star,” he says. “It may not be in my lifetime, but one of these days, that star is going to explode.”

    With a radius about 900 times...

    02/08/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • Feature

    30 years later, supernova 1987A is still sharing secrets

    View the video

    Ian Shelton was alone at a telescope in the remote Atacama Desert of Chile. After three hours getting a picture of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a wispy galaxy that orbits the Milky Way, he was plunged into darkness. High winds had taken hold of the rolltop door in the observatory’s roof, slamming it shut.

    “This was maybe telling me I should just call it a night,” says...

    02/08/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy
  • Reviews & Previews

    Mysteries of time still stump scientists

    Why Time FliesAlan BurdickSimon & Schuster, $28

    The topic of time is both excruciatingly complicated and slippery. The combination makes it easy to get bogged down. But instead of an exhaustive review, journalist Alan Burdick lets curiosity be his guide in Why Time Flies, an approach that leads to a light yet supremely satisfying story about time as it runs through — and is...

    02/08/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Psychology
  • For Daily Use

    Weekend warriors put up a fight against death

    Any exercise — even the weekend warrior approach, cramming it all into Saturday and Sunday — is better than none. Compared with inactive adults, those who got the recommended amount of weekly exercise, or even substantially less, had about a one-third lower risk of death during the study period, researchers report online January 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    Gary O’Donovan at the...

    02/07/2017 - 15:36 Health
  • Rethink

    Pectoral sandpipers go the distance, and then some

    View animated map

    After flying more than 10,000 kilometers from South America to the Arctic, male pectoral sandpipers should be ready to rest their weary wings. But once the compact shorebirds arrive at a breeding ground in Barrow, Alaska, each spring, most keep going — an average of about 3,000 extra kilometers.

    Scientists thought males, which mate with multiple females, stayed...

    02/07/2017 - 07:00 Animals, Ecology
  • Teaser

    For calmer chickens, bathe eggs in light

    Fearful, flighty chickens raised for eating can hurt themselves while trying to avoid human handlers. But there may be a simple way to hatch calmer chicks: Shine light on the eggs for at least 12 hours a day.

    Researchers at the University of California, Davis bathed eggs daily in light for different time periods during their three-week incubation. When the chickens reached 3 to 6 weeks...

    02/06/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Development