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E.g., 10/22/2017
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Your search has returned 27 images:
  • Aedes aegypti larvae
  • illustration of man with umbrella under raining statins
  • Melting sea ice in Barrow, Alaska
Your search has returned 29 articles:
  • 50 years ago, U.S. fell short on mosquito eradication

    Mosquitoes on the way out

    By 1973, just nine years after the start of an antimosquito campaign, the Aedes aegypti will be eradicated from the United States. The mosquito, a potential carrier of yellow fever, dengue and hemorrhagic fever, has been the target of a $23 million attack launched in 1964…. The carrier of these viral diseases can still be found in 10 southern states, Hawaii, the...

    05/04/2017 - 08:00 Animals, Health
  • Editor's Note

    March highlights questions about benefits of science

    On April 22, tens of thousands of scientists and science enthusiasts marched for science in Washington, D.C., and in other cities around the globe. Many participants expressed overtly political messages, but, as Science News reported live via Twitter from the National Mall, many marchers also focused on how much they value science. People gathered en masse in part to recognize science as a...

    05/03/2017 - 11:30 Science & Society
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers concerned about cancer’s sugary disguise

    Sugarcoated

    A new wave of potential immune therapies aims to target the network of complex sugars that coat cancer cells, Esther Landhuis reported in “Cancer’s sweet cloak” (SN: 4/1/17, p. 24). Some of these sugars, called sialic acids, help tumors hide from the immune system.

    “Are the offending sugars referred to in this article the ones we are eating or are they the result of...

    05/03/2017 - 11:20 Cancer, Technology, Animals
  • Feature

    Yes, statins protect hearts. But critics question their expanding use

    Cholesterol is so important to life that practically every human cell makes it. Cells use the compound to keep their membranes porous and springy, and to produce hormones and other vital substances. The body can make all the cholesterol it needs, but Americans tend to have a surplus, thanks in large part to too little exercise and too much meat, cheese and grease. Fifty years ago, researchers...

    05/03/2017 - 07:00 Health, Biomedicine
  • Soapbox

    Radical idea could restore ice in the Arctic Ocean

    Leave it to a researcher who studies icy moons in the outer solar system to come up with an out-there scheme to restore vanishing sea ice in the Arctic.

    Ice is a good insulator, says Steven Desch, a planetary scientist at Arizona State University in Tempe. That’s why moons such as Jupiter’s Europa and Saturn’s Enceladus, among others, may be able to maintain liquid oceans beneath their...

    05/02/2017 - 10:00 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • News

    Here’s how an asteroid impact would kill you

    It won’t be a tsunami. Nor an earthquake. Not even the crushing impact of the space rock. No, if an asteroid kills you, gusting winds and shock waves from falling and exploding space rocks will most likely be to blame. That’s one of the conclusions of a recent computer simulation effort that investigated the fatality risks of more than a million possible asteroid impacts.

    In one extreme...

    05/02/2017 - 07:00 Planetary Science
  • Feature

    Lakes worldwide feel the heat from climate change

    About 40 kilometers off Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula, in the waters of Lake Superior, rises the stone lighthouse of Stannard Rock. Since 1882, it has warned sailors in Great Lakes shipping lanes away from a dangerous shoal. But today, Stannard Rock also helps scientists monitor another danger: climate change.

    Since 2008, a meteorological station at the lighthouse has been measuring...

    05/01/2017 - 07:00 Climate, Ecosystems
  • Reviews & Previews

    Read up on solar eclipses before this year’s big event

    In August, the United States will experience its first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in nearly a century. Over the course of an hour and a half, the moon’s narrow shadow will slice across 12 states, from Oregon to South Carolina (SN: 8/20/16, p. 14). As many as 200 million people are expected to travel to spots where they can view the spectacle, in what could become one of the most...

    04/30/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy, History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    Fox experiment is replaying domestication in fast-forward

    How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)Lee Alan Dugatkinand Lyudmila TrutUniv. of Chicago, $26

    In 1959, Lyudmila Trut rode trains through Siberia to visit fox farms. She wasn’t looking for furs. She needed a farm to host an audacious experiment dreamed up by geneticist Dmitry Belyaev: to create a domestic animal as docile as a dog from aggressive, wily silver foxes.

    Evolutionary...

    04/29/2017 - 08:00 History of Science, Genetics, Animals
  • Science Visualized

    The scales of the ocellated lizard are surprisingly coordinated

    View the video

    A lizard’s intricately patterned skin follows rules like those used by a simple type of computer program.

    As the ocellated lizard (Timon lepidus) grows, it transforms from a drab, polka-dotted youngster to an emerald-flecked adult. Its scales first morph from white and brown to green and black. Then, as the animal ages, individual scales flip from black to green, or...

    04/27/2017 - 06:00 Animals, Biophysics