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E.g., 07/21/2018
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Your search has returned 26 images:
  • illustration of hand with syringe
  • Sumatra earthquake
  • Suez shipping canal
Your search has returned 28 articles:
  • Feature

    Opioids kill. Here’s how an overdose shuts down your body

    03/29/2018 - 07:00 Health, Neuroscience, Biomedicine
  • Reviews & Previews

    How past disasters can help us prepare for the future

    The Big OnesLucy JonesDoubleday, $26.95

    People call Lucy Jones the “earthquake lady.” For nearly 40 years, Jones, a seismologist, has been a leading voice in California on earthquake science and safety. A few months after retiring from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2016, she founded the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society to bring policy makers and scientists together to...

    03/25/2018 - 08:00 Science & Society, History of Science, Earth
  • 50 years ago, invasive species traveled the Suez Canal

    Biological invasion via Suez

    The Red Sea is invading the Mediterranean.… So far about 140 life-forms, mostly animal and mostly invertebrate, have crossed the Isthmus of Suez.… It is possible that this … will result in the loss of a few native fish and invertebrate populations to stiff competition from the newcomers. — Science News, March 30, 1968

    Update

    Whether the movement of...

    03/23/2018 - 07:00 Ecology, Animals, Ecosystems
  • Editor's Note

    Why it’s great to have a geologist in the house

    Science has a way of surprising us when we least expect it. Like with mud rocks.

    We science journalists can be a cranky lot, eternally skeptical as to whether a touted advance is really significant enough to warrant coverage. So when Science News’ managing editor Erin Wayman waxed enthusiastic about a study explaining how ancient plants may have played a key role in making Earth...

    03/22/2018 - 10:19 Science & Society, Earth, Plants
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder children’s pretend play, planetary dust storms and more

    Flight of fantasy

    Similar to their hunter-gatherer counterparts, many children in Western societies prefer play that mimics the things that adults do, Bruce Bower reported in “When it’s playtime, many kids prefer reality over fantasy" (SN: 2/17/18, p. 22). But fantasy play may still be valuable.

    Reader Pat Rapp wondered about the implications of an experiment that showed that...

    03/22/2018 - 10:18 Anthropology, Technology, Planetary Science
  • Feature

    How oral vaccines could save Ethiopian wolves from extinction

    Deep in the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, wildlife workers trek up above 9,800 feet to save some of the world’s most rare carnivores, Ethiopian wolves.

    “It’s cold, tough work,” says Eric Bedin, who leads the field monitoring team in its uphill battle.

    In this sparse, sometimes snowy landscape, the lanky and ginger-colored wolves (Canis simensis) reign as the region’s apex predators....

    03/22/2018 - 09:00 Animals, Biomedicine, Conservation
  • Science Visualized

    Meet the giants among viruses

    For decades, the name “virus” meant small and simple. Not anymore. Meet the giants.

    Today, scientists are finding ever bigger viruses that pack impressive amounts of genetic material. The era of the giant virus began in 2003 with the discovery of the first Mimivirus (SN: 5/23/09, p. 9). The viral titan is about 750 nanometers across with a genetic pantry boasting around 1.2 million base...

    03/21/2018 - 07:00 Microbiology
  • News

    Brain waves may focus attention and keep information flowing

    We can’t see it, but brains hum with electrical activity. Brain waves created by the coordinated firing of huge collections of nerve cells pinball around the brain. The waves can ricochet from the front of the brain to the back, or from deep structures all the way to the scalp and then back again.

    Called neuronal oscillations, these signals are known to accompany certain mental states....

    03/13/2018 - 13:00 Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Give double-layer graphene a twist and it superconducts

    LOS ANGELES — Give a graphene layer cake a twist and it superconducts — electrons flow freely through it without resistance. Made up of two layers of graphene, a form of carbon arranged in single-atom-thick sheets, the structure’s weird behavior suggests it may provide a fruitful playground for testing how certain unusual types of superconductors work, physicist Pablo Jarillo-Herrero of MIT...

    03/08/2018 - 16:10 Condensed Matter, Materials
  • News

    On Twitter, the lure of fake news is stronger than the truth

    There’s been a lot of talk about fake news running rampant online, but now there’s data to back up the discussion.

    An analysis of more than 4.5 million tweets and retweets posted from 2006 to 2017 indicates that inaccurate news stories spread faster and further on the social media platform than true stories. The research also suggests that people play a bigger role in sharing falsehoods...

    03/08/2018 - 14:00 Technology, Science & Society