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Your search has returned 25 articles:
  • News

    Mars got its crust quickly

    Mars was a fully formed planet — crust and all — within just 20 million years of the solar system’s birth. That rapid formation means the Red Planet probably got a 100-million-year jump on Earth in terms of habitability, new research suggests.

    Geochemical analyses of crystals of the mineral zircon extracted from Martian meteorites reveal that Mars had formed its earliest crust by 4.547...

    06/27/2018 - 13:00 Planetary Science, Earth
  • News

    Poliovirus treatment helped patients with deadly brain tumors live longer

    Few treatment options are available to people facing a second battle with a particularly fatal type of brain tumor called glioblastoma. But dosing the tumor with a genetically modified poliovirus — one that doesn’t cause the eponymous, devastating disease — may give these patients more time, a small clinical study suggests.

    Of 61 people with recurring glioblastoma who were treated with...

    06/26/2018 - 17:50 Cancer, Clinical Trials
  • News in Brief

    Zika gets the most extreme close-up of any flavivirus

    Researchers have gotten the closest look ever at Zika virus and may have discovered some chinks in its armor.

    Using cryo-electron microscopy, structural biologist Madhumati Sevvana and colleagues mapped Zika’s structure at 3.1-angstrom (or 0.31-nanometer) resolution. That closeup view, reported online June 26 in Structure, is about equivalent to the size of two atoms. It’s the most...

    06/26/2018 - 11:00 Microbiology
  • For Daily Use

    What is it about hogweed — and lemons and limes — that can cause burns?

    Another warning to add to the summertime list: check for ticks, go inside during lightning … and hands off the giant hogweed. Getting the plant’s sap on the skin, along with exposure to sun, can lead to severe burns.

    All good advice, but the invasive plant, which looks like Queen Anne’s lace on steroids, and was recently spotted in Virginia, isn’t the only vegetation that contains the...

    06/22/2018 - 10:00 Health
  • It's Alive

    How a squishy clam conquers a rock

    Burrowing giant clams have perfected the ship-in-a-bottle trick, and the one big thing that scientists convinced themselves couldn’t explain it, actually can.

    Tridacna crocea, the smallest of the 10 or so giant clam species, grows a shell that eventually reaches the size of a large fist. Starting as youngsters, the burrowers bore into the stony mass of an Indo-Pacific coral reef,...

    06/22/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Physiology, Microbes
  • News

    New studies add evidence to a possible link between Alzheimer’s and herpesvirus

    Joel Dudley and his colleagues were searching through datasets for Alzheimer’s disease vulnerabilities to exploit in creating a treatment when they stumbled across a surprising correlation: Many of the brains they looked at had signs of herpesvirus infection. But those from people with Alzheimer’s disease had much higher levels of viral DNA than those from healthy people.

    In particular,...

    06/22/2018 - 06:00 Health, Neuroscience, Genetics
  • News

    A 2,200-year-old Chinese tomb held a new gibbon species, now extinct

    A royal crypt from China’s past has issued a conservation alert for apes currently eking out an existence in East Asia.

    The partial remains of a gibbon were discovered in 2004 in an excavation of a 2,200- to 2,300-year-old tomb in central China’s Shaanxi Province. Now, detailed comparisons of the animal’s face and teeth with those of living gibbons show that the buried ape is from a...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heart

    Coffee revs up cell’s energy factories and helps hearts recover from heart attacks, a study of mice suggests.

    In the study, researchers gave mice the equivalent of four cups of coffee a day for 10 days before inducing heart attacks in the rodents. Cells in mice that got caffeine repaired the heart attack damage better than cells in mice that didn’t get caffeine, researchers report June...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells, Physiology
  • News in Brief

    Einstein’s general relativity reigns supreme, even on a galactic scale

    Chalk up another win for Einstein’s seemingly invincible theory of gravity. A new study shows that the theory of general relativity holds true even over vast distances.

    General relativity prevailed within a region spanning a galactic distance of about 6,500 light-years, scientists report in the June 22 Science. Previously, researchers have precisely tested the theory by studying its...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genes

    Turning on genes may work like forming a flash mob.

    Inside a cell’s nucleus, fast-moving groups of floppy proteins crowd together around gene control switches and coalesce into droplets to turn on genes, Ibrahim Cissé of MIT and colleagues report June 21 in two papers in Science.

    Researchers have previously demonstrated that proteins form such droplets in the cytoplasm, the cell’s...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells