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  • News

    Asthma pressure may shrink airways

    From San Francisco, at the spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society

    The chest tightness that an asthma patient experiences may be in part the cause of the disease as well as a symptom.

    Most physicians and scientists have believed that inflammation alone causes air passages to gradually narrow in asthmatics. However, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of...

    10/04/2002 - 13:31 Biomedicine
  • News

    Now, nylon comes in killer colors

    From San Francisco, at the spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society

    Sock science marches on. Last year, researchers at the University of California, Davis and HaloSource Corp. in Seattle developed a treatment that makes white cotton fabric a death zone for disease- and odor-causing bacteria (SN: 9/11/99, p. 170). Consumers could soon see athletic socks made of the fabric...

    10/04/2002 - 13:29 Chemistry
  • News

    The planet that isn't

    "Too darn hot." The title of a Cole Porter tune sums up why an astronomer has now retracted her 1998 claim that the faint object her team imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope is most likely a planet. Her original announcement made front-page headlines (SN: 6/6/98, p. 357) since her observations appeared to be the first direct detection of a planet outside the solar system.

    The...

    10/04/2002 - 13:28
  • News

    Observatory on a suicide mission

    In the interest of safety, NASA has decided to plunge a spacecraft into the Pacific Ocean.

    Late last year, one of the three gyroscopes on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) failed, leaving the satellite with the minimum number necessary to steer the craft. The space agency wants to direct the craft back through Earth's atmosphere in a controlled manner, while the two other gyros...

    10/04/2002 - 13:26 Astronomy
  • News

    Chemotherapy baldness thwarted in rats

    From San Francisco, at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    Drug therapies target tumors by killing rapidly dividing cells. Unfortunately, these treatments also knock out cells that grow hair. Scientists studying rats have now developed a medication that wards off this side effect of cancer therapy.

    They smeared a compound called GW8510 on the...

    10/04/2002 - 13:25 Biomedicine
  • News

    Protein predicts prostate cancer spread

    From San Francisco, at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    Prostate cancer patients who harbor high concentrations of a protein called thymosine beta-15 in their tumors face an increased risk that the cancer will spread, new research shows.

    Researchers at Harvard Medical School in Boston tracked 32 prostate cancer patients who received only...

    10/04/2002 - 13:23 Biomedicine
  • News

    Getting melanoma chemotherapy to work

    From San Francisco, at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    People with the skin cancer called melanoma respond poorly to chemotherapy. Austrian researchers now report that a drug known as G3139 can turn off a gene that underlies this resistance.

    This gene, bcl-2, produces a protein that shields tumor cells from chemotherapy by thwarting the...

    10/04/2002 - 13:21 Biomedicine
  • News

    High estrogen linked to lung cancer

    From San Francisco, at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    Women seem more susceptible than men to the carcinogenic effects of tobacco smoke, research has indicated. New findings suggest that estrogen may also play a role.

    When estrogen is present, some cells produce a protein on their surfaces called an estrogen receptor. The hormone can then...

    10/04/2002 - 13:20 Biomedicine
  • News

    Breast cancer options made clearer

    From San Francisco, at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

    Women with breast cancer that hasn't spread to their lymph nodes face a difficult decision: After having surgery to remove tumor tissue from the breast, should they also have chemotherapy? A study in Germany now suggests that an inexpensive test could help determine who would be most likely to...

    10/04/2002 - 13:18 Biomedicine
  • News

    Impurities clock crystal growth rates

    Quartz is one of the purest minerals known. Nevertheless, tiny amounts of impurities have an important effect on this crystalline form of silicon dioxide. The delicately hued type of natural quartz known as amethyst, for example, owes its distinctive purple color to traces of iron compounds that are locked into its crystal lattice as it grows.

    By focusing on another type of...

    10/04/2002 - 13:16 Earth