Search Content | Science News

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

Search Content

E.g., 06/24/2019
E.g., 06/24/2019
Your search has returned 12 images:
  • cicada
Your search has returned 58 articles:
  • People

    Postcards from Voyager

    To catch the faint signal of a spacecraft leaving the solar system, you have to listen very carefully. At NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., that’s Suzanne Dodd’s job.

    Dodd (below) is project manager for NASA’s twin Voyager probes, launched in 1977 to explore Jupiter and Saturn. Voyager 2 did that and more, as the first probe to fly by Uranus, in 1986, and Neptune, in...

    06/28/2013 - 18:52 Astronomy
  • Nobelist's Cancer Theory

    The key to finding the cause and treatment of cancer is the balance between two newly found substances in the body, Dr. Albert Szent-Györgyi, the 1937 nobelist in medicine, has suggested. The substances are promine, which causes sudden cell growth, and retine, a similar chemical that holds back growth…. He predicted in Science, 140: 1391, 1963, that the new theory will “open a wide...

    06/28/2013 - 10:11 Cancer
  • Reviews & Previews

    Billion-Dollar Fish

    From imitation crab to McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish sandwiches, Alaska pollock is ubiquitous. American fishermen haul in more than a billion dollars’ worth of the flaky white fish annually. Yet just a century ago, Americans had no interest in pollock. Bailey, a fisheries biologist, documents the fish’s rise in popularity over the last 60 years, interweaving the scientific, political and...

    06/28/2013 - 10:08 Conservation
  • Reviews & Previews

    Brilliant Blunders

    Even brilliant scientists have bad days. Consider chemist Linus Pauling, who described the alpha helix structure of proteins in 1951. When he attempted to do the same for DNA, however, he botched it — badly. Among other problems, he flubbed the basic chemistry, proposing a structure for deoxyribonucleic acid that wasn’t an acid.

    When asked about Pauling’s faulty DNA model,...

    06/28/2013 - 10:04 History of Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Letters to the editor

    Fructose fever I was fascinated by the article “Sweet confusion” (SN: 6/1/13, p. 22) about the ambiguous health effects of high fructose corn syrup. I was surprised, however, to find little mention of taste, flavor and satiety. I can clearly recall from my childhood the satisfaction from a bottle of Coca-Cola. The transition in America in the 1970s from sucrose to corn syrup as a sweetener in...

    06/28/2013 - 09:59