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Your search has returned 42 articles:
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Science & Society

    Credit: Ayimages/Istockphoto

    Vaccine link to autism dismissed In February, Lancet formally retracted a 1998 study that had kindled a storm of opposition to vaccines (SN Online: 2/3/10). The research suggested that autism arose in a handful of children after the kids received shots to prevent measles, mumps and rubella. The study's lead author committed several ethical breaches,...

    12/17/2010 - 14:02
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Nutrition

    Credit: Krasowit/Shutterstock

    Fish oil packs a punch Omega-3 fatty acids are turning up in plenty of promising reports, but some tests fail to show a benefit. Reported anti-inflammatory effects of the compound may help to shake out just how these nutrients boost health. High levels of omega-3s are found in fish oil from cold-water species and in walnut and flaxseed oils.

    ...

    12/17/2010 - 14:02
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Earth

    Credit: Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Getty Images

    Inside the Haiti quake Some 230,000 Haitians died when a magnitude-7 earthquake struck just outside Port-au-Prince on the afternoon of January 12. Scientists from around the world scrambled to the scene (SN Online: 1/16/10) to assess which fault had ruptured and whether more people were at risk. Early ideas held that the quake had...

    12/17/2010 - 14:01
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Molecules

    Credit: Happy Little Nomad/Wikimedia Commons

    Gimme an F Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes the world go ’round, has come in four known flavors for more than 60 years: chlorophylls a, b, c and d. Now scientists have discovered another version of the pigment that allows plants and other photosynthesizing organisms to harness sunlight for making food and oxygen. Dubbed...

    12/17/2010 - 14:01
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Genes & Cells

    Credit: © Joe McNally/reconstruction by Kennis and Kennis

    Gene sequencing for all, even Neandertals An unprecedented picture of life’s diversity is emerging as researchers publish the full genetic instruction books of a growing list of species — including one that has been extinct for more than 30,000 years.

    A project sequencing Neandertal DNA harvested from bones...

    12/17/2010 - 14:00
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Humans

    Credit: Y. Haile-Selassie et al/PNAS 2010

    Extreme makeover for Lucy’s kind Recent fossil discoveries suggest that the early hominid species represented by the famous bones of Lucy, who lived 3.2 million years ago in Ethiopia, may have been more like modern humans than previously thought. The skeleton of a 3.6-million-year-old male of the same species, Australopithecus...

    12/17/2010 - 13:57
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Technology

    Credit: Michael Morgenstern

    Lie detectors blend fact and fiction Devices that can discern honest statements from lies are much sought after, especially since a 2003 National Research Council report concluded that traditional polygraphs flag stress, not deception. But newer gadgets increasingly used by police departments and other agencies don’t tell fact from fiction either,...

    12/17/2010 - 13:56
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Body & Brain

    Credit: © Bettmann/Corbis

    Gene therapy moves forward Despite their promise, technologies to correct defective genes have been plagued by safety problems leading to unintended — and sometimes fatal — outcomes. But scientists are inching toward safer, more effective gene therapies that may one day treat a range of diseases, from psychiatric disorders to autoimmune diseases to...

    12/17/2010 - 13:56
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Numbers

    The Tao of traffic lights When a traffic light goes green can seem to hinge on whimsy rather than the number of vehicles waiting. Scientists propose speeding up traffic by making signals go with the flow (SN: 10/23/10, p. 8). Inspired by the movement of crowds through narrow spaces such as doorways, Swiss and German researchers tried a responsive, flexible approach, rather than a top-down,...

    12/17/2010 - 13:55
  • Feature

    2010 Science News of the Year: Atom & Cosmos

    Extrasolar planets coming into focus The discovery of a planet orbiting a dim dwarf star about 20 light-years from Earth has encouraged astronomers in their hunt for habitable, and maybe even inhabited, worlds elsewhere in the galaxy (SN: 10/23/10, p. 5). Though some researchers question the finding (SN: 11/6/10, p. 14), astronomers suspect that dozens of potentially habitable worlds will be...

    12/17/2010 - 13:55 Astronomy