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E.g., 04/27/2019
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  • Reviews & Previews

    A mathematician traces his journey from poverty to prominence

    The Shape of a LifeShing-Tung Yau and Steve NadisYale Univ., $28

    One of the first remarkable things that mathematician Shing-Tung Yau reveals in his memoir, The Shape of a Life, is that his name was not originally Yau. His family fled China to British-ruled Hong Kong in 1949 when he was an infant, and the name Yau came from a mistranslation on a registration form when he entered...

    04/26/2019 - 09:00 Numbers, Science & Society
  • News

    Endangered green sea turtles may be making a comeback in the U.S. Pacific

    Beleaguered populations of green sea turtles living in and around Hawaii and American Pacific island territories are increasing in number. 

    From 2002 to 2015, scuba diving researchers circumnavigated 53 islands, atolls and coral reefs throughout the U.S. Pacific, conducting the first comprehensive survey in that region of the turtles’ ocean habitats. Over the 13 years, the divers counted...

    04/26/2019 - 07:00 Animals, Ecosystems, Oceans
  • News

    A lack of circular RNAs may trigger lupus

    A lack of certain mysterious genetic molecules may spin the immune system out of control and lead to lupus.

    People with lupus have lower than normal levels of circular RNAs, triggering an immune reaction meant to fight viruses, biochemist Lingling Chen of the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and her colleagues discovered. Switching on the body’s virus-fighting...

    04/25/2019 - 11:00 Genetics, Biomedicine
  • News

    A global survey finds that the Arctic Ocean is a hot spot for viruses

    Arctic waters turn out to be teeming with some of the world’s smallest entities — viruses.

    Water samples taken during a three-year expedition around the world’s oceans identified around 200,000 virus species, roughly 12 times the number found in a previous smaller survey. And 42 percent of those viruses were found exclusively in the Arctic, researchers report April 25 in Cell.

    The...

    04/25/2019 - 11:00 Microbes, Oceans, Ecology
  • 50 years ago, scientists fought over element 104’s discovery

    Another route to 104 —

    In 1964, a few radioactive atoms existed for three-tenths of a second in a Soviet laboratory, and G.N. Flerov and his colleagues, who detected it, announced the discovery of element 104. But the announcement was met with skepticism in the United States.… Now, U.S. scientists declare they have gone their own route to corral the elusive element. — Science News,...

    04/25/2019 - 07:00 Chemistry, Physics
  • News

    U.S. measles cases hit a record high since the disease was eliminated in 2000

    U.S. measles cases have soared to the highest number since the disease was declared eliminated in the country in 2000. The 2019 tally now stands at 695 cases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. That surpasses the previous high of 667 cases in 2014.

    “The high number of cases in 2019 is primarily the result of a few large outbreaks — one in Washington State and...

    04/24/2019 - 20:05 Health
  • News in Brief

    A marine parasite’s mitochondria lack DNA but still churn out energy

    One parasite that feeds on algae is so voracious that it even stole its own mitochondria’s DNA.

    Mitochondria — the energy-generating parts of cells — of the parasitic plankton Amoebophyra ceratii seem to have transferred all of their DNA to the cell’s nucleus, researchers report April 24 in Science Advances. The discovery is the first time that scientists have found an oxygen-using...

    04/24/2019 - 14:52 Genetics, Microbes
  • News in Brief

    Excavations show hunter-gatherers lived in the Amazon more than 10,000 years ago

    Hunter-gatherers occupied the southwestern Amazon rainforest by around 10,600 years ago — at least several thousand years earlier than previously thought.

    Excavated food remains and human burials at several locations in Bolivia support a scenario in which hunter-gatherers regularly occupied those spots for large parts of the year. The unearthed evidence also indicates that the hunter-...

    04/24/2019 - 14:00 Archaeology
  • News

    This is the slowest radioactive decay ever spotted

    For the first time, researchers have directly observed an exotic type of radioactive decay called two-neutrino double electron capture.

    The decay, seen in xenon-124 atoms, happens so sparingly that it would take 18 sextillion years (18 followed by 21 zeros) for a sample of xenon-124 to shrink by half, making the decay extremely difficult to detect. The long-anticipated observation of two...

    04/24/2019 - 13:00 Particle Physics, Physics, Chemistry
  • News

    A neural implant can translate brain activity into sentences

    To communicate, people unable to talk often rely on small eye movements to spell out words, a painstakingly slow process. Now, using signals picked up by a brain implant, scientists have pulled entire sentences from the brain.

    Some of these reconstructed words, spoken aloud by a virtual vocal cord, are a little garbled. But overall, the sentences are understandable, researchers from the...

    04/24/2019 - 13:00 Health, Neuroscience