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E.g., 12/10/2017
E.g., 12/10/2017
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  • Titan map
  • breast cancer cells
  • illustration of a superconductor
Your search has returned 109723 articles:
  • News

    Most complete map of Titan reveals connected seas and cookie-cutter lakes

    Liquid methane and ethane flow through a subterranean plumbing system on Titan, which drains lakes and connects seas. That’s one of the first scientific results from the latest, most complete map of the Saturnian moon’s topography.

    Planetary scientist Paul Corlies of Cornell University and colleagues released the map — based on all the data from NASA’s Cassini mission, which ended in...

    12/08/2017 - 12:40 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    When tumors fuse with blood vessels, clumps of breast cancer cells can spread

    PHILADELPHIA — If you want to beat them, join them. Some breast cancer tumors may follow that strategy to spread through the body.

    Breast cancer tumors can fuse with blood vessel cells, allowing clumps of cancer cells to break away from the main tumor and ride the bloodstream to other locations in the body, suggests preliminary research. Cell biologist Vanesa Silvestri of Johns Hopkins...

    12/08/2017 - 11:42 Cancer, Cells
  • News

    Some high-temperature superconductors might not be so odd after all

    A misfit gang of superconducting materials may be losing their outsider status.

    Certain copper-based compounds superconduct, or transmit electricity without resistance, at unusually high temperatures. It was thought that the standard theory of superconductivity, known as Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, couldn’t explain these oddballs. But new evidence suggests that the standard theory...

    12/08/2017 - 07:00 Condensed Matter, Physics, Materials
  • News

    Narwhals react to certain dangers in a really strange way

    View the video

    When escaping from humans, narwhals don’t just freeze or flee. They do both.

    These deep-diving marine mammals have similar physiological responses to those of an animal frozen in fear: Their heart rate, breathing and metabolism slow, mimicking a “deer in the headlights” reaction. But narwhals (Monodon monoceros) take this freeze response to extremes. The animals...

    12/07/2017 - 14:41 Animals, Oceans, Physiology
  • News

    AI eavesdrops on dolphins and discovers six unknown click types

    A new computer program has an ear for dolphin chatter.

    The algorithm uncovered six previously unknown types of dolphin echolocation clicks in underwater recordings from the Gulf of Mexico, researchers report online December 7 in PLOS Computational Biology. Identifying which species produce the newly discovered click varieties could help scientists better keep tabs on wild dolphin...

    12/07/2017 - 14:00 Computing, Animals
  • News

    CRISPR/Cas9 can reverse multiple diseases in mice

    A new twist on gene editing makes the CRISPR/Cas9 molecular scissors act as a highlighter for the genetic instruction book. Such highlighting helps turn on specific genes.

    Using the new tool, researchers treated mouse versions of type 1 diabetes, kidney injury and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the team reports December 7 in Cell. The new method may make some types of gene therapy easier...

    12/07/2017 - 12:25 Genetics, Biomedicine
  • News

    Microwaved, hard-boiled eggs can explode. But the bang isn’t the worst part.

    Hard-boiled eggs are a dish best served cold.

    When quickly reheated in a microwave and then pierced, the picnic staple can explode with a loud bang in a shower of hot, rubbery shrapnel. But this blast is far more likely to make a hot mess than hurt your hearing, according to research presented December 6 at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in New Orleans.

    That distinction...

    12/07/2017 - 07:00 Physics
  • News

    What hospitals can do to help keep excess opioids out of communities

    To halt the misuse of opioids, it may help to slash the number of pills prescribed, a new study suggests.

    Five months after the implementation of new opioid prescription guidelines at a University of Michigan hospital, roughly 7,000 fewer pills went home with patients — a drop that might reduce the risk of accessible pills leading to substance abuse. But the opioid reduction didn’t leave...

    12/06/2017 - 17:23 Health
  • Introducing

    This new dinosaur species was one odd duck

    It may have walked like a duck and swum like a penguin, but a flipper-limbed creature discovered in what is now Mongolia was no bird. The strange new species is the first known nonavian dinosaur that could both run and swim, researchers say.

    To compensate for a long swanlike neck, probably used for dipping underwater for fish, this dino’s center of mass shifted toward its hips, allowing...

    12/06/2017 - 13:29 Paleontology, Animals, Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    The most distant quasar ever spotted hails from the universe’s infancy

    The most distant quasar yet spotted sends its light from the universe’s toddler years. The quasar, called J1342+0928, existed when the universe was only 690 million years old, right when the first stars and galaxies were forming.

    Quasars are bright disks of gas and dust swirling around supermassive black holes. The black hole that powers J1342+0928 has a mass equivalent to 800 million...

    12/06/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy, Cosmology