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E.g., 06/18/2019
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  • News in Brief

    ‘Sneezing’ plants may spread pathogens to their neighbors

    Next time you pass a wheat field on a dewy morning, you might want to say “gesundheit.”

    That’s because some sick plants can “sneeze” — shooting out tiny water droplets laden with pathogens, scientists report June 19 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. In wheat plants infected with the fungus Puccinia triticina, coalescing dew droplets flew away from the leaves they were on and...

    06/18/2019 - 19:01 Biophysics, Plants, Fungi
  • News in Brief

    Rotavirus vaccines may lower kids’ chances of getting type 1 diabetes

    The rotavirus vaccine may have an unexpected benefit: a reduced likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes.

    The vaccine is highly effective at protecting against intestinal infections caused by the virus (SN: 8/8/15, p. 5). Past work in mice prone to diabetes suggests infection with rotavirus can hasten damage to beta cells in the pancreas, the cells that are destroyed in a person with...

    06/18/2019 - 10:45 Health
  • News

    Female rats face sex bias too

    When researchers release a new finding about the brain, it’s often mice or rats who have run the mazes and taken the tests for science. People might wonder: Are rodents good substitutes for humans? Maybe for men, but what about women?

    That’s less likely, because most neuroscience experiments don’t use female rodents — a fact one scientist says comes from outdated ideas that should go...

    06/18/2019 - 08:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Hyenas roamed the Arctic during the last ice age

    Modern hyenas stalk the savannas of Asia and Africa, but the animals’ ancient relatives may have had snowier stomping grounds: the Arctic. Two fossilized teeth, collected in Canada in the 1970s, confirm a long-held hunch that ancient hyenas ventured into North America via the Bering land bridge, scientists say.

    The teeth belonged to members of the extinct genus Chasmaporthetes, also...

    06/18/2019 - 06:00 Paleontology, Animals, Ecology
  • News

    Norovirus close-ups might help fight stomach flu

    Knowing your enemy is an important principle of competition, and scientists may just have become more familiar with one nasty stomach virus.

    Closeup looks at several strains of norovirus reveal that the vomit- and diarrhea-inducing virus can come in a variety of sizes, researchers report online June 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Knobs studding the virus’s...

    06/17/2019 - 10:00 Microbiology, Microbes, Health
  • News in Brief

    Diamond detectors could aid the search for dark matter

    A new idea for detecting dark matter really sparkles.

    Diamonds could be used to search for the mysterious substance, a team of scientists suggests. Detectors containing the crystals could spot potential dark matter particles with relatively low masses, the researchers report in the June 15 Physical Review D.

    Dark matter is an unidentified substance that scientists think must exist...

    06/17/2019 - 08:00 Particle Physics, Technology
  • News

    Is a long-dormant Russian volcano waking up? It’s complicated

    Seismic rumbles beneath a long-dormant volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula could herald an imminent eruption, a team of scientists says. But other researchers say that the observed seismic activity could be related to already erupting volcanoes in the region.

    Fewer than 10,500 people live within 100 kilometers of the volcano, called Bolshaya Udina, making a catastrophic eruption that...

    06/17/2019 - 06:00 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Table salt may be hiding in Europa’s underground sea

    What flavors our food may also season the sea of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

    Sulfate salts were thought to lurk in the watery ocean under the moon’s icy crust. But data from the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that common table salt dominates the sea’s chemistry, researchers report June 12 in Science Advances.

    “This could mean that the ocean chemistry is more similar to what we’re used...

    06/14/2019 - 11:02 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    Many of the world’s rivers are flush with dangerous levels of antibiotics

    In a massive survey of rivers across 72 countries, researchers found antibiotics at 66 percent of 711 sites sampled. Many of the most drug-polluted waterways were in Asia and Africa, where there hadn’t been much data until now.

    Environmental pollution from antibiotics is one driver of microbial drug resistance, which threatens public health. People should be as concerned about resistance...

    06/14/2019 - 09:00 Ecosystems, Pollution, Sustainability
  • News

    Massive superflares have been seen erupting from stars like the sun

    ST. LOUIS — It isn’t only young stars that spit high-energy superflares. Older stars, such as the sun, can also send out bursts of energy that could be powerful enough to strip away planetary atmospheres in close orbit, researchers report.

    Such superflares can be seen from hundreds of light-years away. Astrophysicists had assumed that only young stars had these outbursts. But a team of...

    06/14/2019 - 07:00 Astronomy