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  • News

    3-D mammograms are popular, but are they better than 2-D?

    In recent years, women getting a mammogram have had a new decision to make: 2-D or 3-D?

    Some breast-care centers have touted the newer 3-D mammography technology as more accurate. But while initial research suggests that it may be a more sensitive diagnostic test, evidence that the technology actually reduces the number of deaths from breast cancer better than 2-D imaging is lacking....

    06/24/2019 - 12:09 Health
  • News

    Gut microbes might help elite athletes boost their physical performance

    One difference between elite athletes and the rest of us might be in what hangs out in their guts.

    Microbes that flourished in the guts of some runners after a marathon boosted the time that lab mice ran on a treadmill, researchers report June 24 in Nature Medicine. These particular microbes seem to take lactate, pumped out by muscles during exercise, and turn it into a compound that may...

    06/24/2019 - 11:00 Microbes, Biomedicine, Microbiology
  • News

    Capuchin monkeys’ stone-tool use has evolved over 3,000 years

    Excavations in Brazil have pounded out new insights into the handiness of ancient monkeys.

    South American capuchin monkeys have not only hammered and dug with carefully chosen stones for the last 3,000 years, but also have selected pounding tools of varying sizes and weights along the way.

    Capuchin stone implements recovered at a site in northeastern Brazil display signs of shifts...

    06/24/2019 - 11:00 Archaeology, Animals
  • News

    The highest-energy photons ever seen hail from the Crab Nebula

    Physicists have spotted the highest-energy light ever seen. It emanated from the roiling remains left behind when a star exploded.

    This light made its way to Earth from the Crab Nebula, a remnant of a stellar explosion, or supernova, about 6,500 light-years away in the Milky Way. The Tibet AS-gamma experiment caught multiple particles of light — or photons — from the nebula with energies...

    06/24/2019 - 07:00 Astronomy, Particle Physics
  • Feature

    New approaches may help solve the Lyme disease diagnosis dilemma

    In 2005, Rachel Straub was a college student returning home from a three-week medical service mission in Central America. Soon after, she suffered a brutal case of the flu. Or so she thought.

     “We were staying in orphanages,” she says of her trip to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. “There were bugs everywhere. I remember going to the bathroom and the sinks would be solid bugs.” She plucked at...

    06/23/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Microbes, Immune Science
  • June 22, 2019

    06/22/2019 - 07:00
  • News

    Parasites ruin some finches’ songs by chewing through the birds’ beaks

    Invasive parasites in the Galápagos Islands may leave some Darwin’s tree finches singing the blues.

    The nonnative Philornis downsi fly infests the birds’ nests and lays its eggs there. Fly larvae feast on the chicks’ blood and tissue, producing festering wounds and killing over half of the baby birds. Among survivors, larval damage to the birds’ beaks may mess with the birds’ songs when...

    06/21/2019 - 11:39 Animals, Evolution, Ecology
  • News

    The cosmic ‘Cow’ may be a strange supernova

    The cosmic oddity known as the Cow may have been a dying star that shed its skin like a snake before it exploded.

    Newly released observations support the idea that the burst occurred in a dense environment with strong magnetic fields, astronomer Kuiyun Huang and colleagues report in The Astrophysical Journal Letters June 12.

    These new measurements “for the mysterious transient …...

    06/21/2019 - 10:54 Astronomy
  • News

    How NASA’s portable atomic clock could revolutionize space travel

    Traveling the solar system could one day be as easy as taking a bus to work. Scientists envision self-driving spaceships ferrying astronauts through deep space, and GPS-like systems guiding visitors across the terrains of other planets and moons. But for those futuristic navigation schemes, spacecraft and satellites would need to be equipped with clocks that keep time with extreme precision —...

    06/21/2019 - 07:00 Technology, Planetary Science
  • News

    Lost wallets are more likely to be returned if they hold cash

    If you’re prone to losing your wallet, keep it filled with cash.

    That’s a tip from researchers who “lost” over 17,000 wallets in 40 countries. In all but two countries, the likelihood of a stranger returning a wallet increased if there was money inside. And the more money in the wallet, the higher the rate of return, the researchers report June 20 in Science. 

    “We were expecting a...

    06/20/2019 - 15:45 Science & Society, Human Evolution