Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 09/26/2017
E.g., 09/26/2017
Your search has returned 174 images:
  • portable tower for measuring wind speed
  • ice shelves in western Antarctic Peninsula
  • giant larvacean
Your search has returned 193 articles:
  • Science & the Public

    How hurricanes and other devastating disasters spur scientific research

    Every day, it seems like there’s a new natural disaster in the headlines. Hurricane Harvey inundates Texas. Hurricane Irma plows through the Caribbean and the U.S. south, and Jose is hot on its heels. A deadly 8.1-magnitude earthquake rocks Mexico. Wildfires blanket the western United States in choking smoke.

    While gripping tales of loss and heroism rightly fill the news, another story...

    09/12/2017 - 17:15 Earth, Oceans, Science & Society
  • Science Visualized

    How deep water surfaces around Antarctica

    View the video

    There’s no signpost to mark it, but about 3,000 meters underwater off the southeast coast of South America, a stream of deep water from the Atlantic Ocean spills into the Southern Ocean. Now new maps reveal in 3-D how the path of that water, called the North Atlantic Deep Water, spirals southeastward and up toward the surface around Antarctica.

    The incoming water,...

    09/01/2017 - 13:00 Oceans, Climate
  • Science Ticker

    Giant larvaceans could be ferrying ocean plastic to the seafloor

    View the video

    Everybody poops, but the poop of bloblike filter feeders called giant larvaceans could be laced with microplastics.

    Every day, these gelatinous creatures (Bathochordaeus stygius) build giant disposable mucus mansions to round up zooplankton into their stomachs — sometimes sifting through around 80 liters of seawater per hour. Kakani Katija and her colleagues at the...

    08/16/2017 - 15:23 Animals, Oceans, Pollution
  • News

    Deep heat may have spawned one of the world’s deadliest tsunamis

    Chemical transformations in minerals deep beneath the seafloor could explain why Indonesia’s 2004 mega-earthquake was unexpectedly destructive, researchers report in the May 26 Science. 

    The magnitude 9.2 quake and the tsunami that it triggered killed more than 250,000 people, flattened villages, and swept homes out to sea across Southeast Asia. It was one of the deadliest tsunamis in...

    05/25/2017 - 14:00 Earth, Oceans
  • Science Visualized

    Stunning images reveal glacial landscapes under the oceans

    View the slideshow

    The footprints of long-gone glaciers and icebergs are now frozen in time in a stunning new collection of images of Earth’s seafloor.

    The Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms is a comprehensive, high-resolution atlas of underwater landscapes that have been shaped by glaciers, largely in polar and subpolar regions, and provides a comparative look at how glaciers,...

    05/12/2017 - 11:00 Earth, Climate, Oceans
  • News

    Sea creatures’ sticky ‘mucus houses’ catch ocean carbon really fast

    View the video

    Never underestimate the value of a disposable mucus house.

    Filmy, see-through envelopes of mucus, called “houses,” get discarded daily by the largest of the sea creatures that exude them. The old houses, often more than a meter across, sink toward the ocean bottom carrying with them plankton and other biological tidbits snagged in their goo.

    Now, scientists...

    05/04/2017 - 13:28 Animals, Oceans, Climate
  • Soapbox

    Radical idea could restore ice in the Arctic Ocean

    Leave it to a researcher who studies icy moons in the outer solar system to come up with an out-there scheme to restore vanishing sea ice in the Arctic.

    Ice is a good insulator, says Steven Desch, a planetary scientist at Arizona State University in Tempe. That’s why moons such as Jupiter’s Europa and Saturn’s Enceladus, among others, may be able to maintain liquid oceans beneath their...

    05/02/2017 - 10:00 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • Science Ticker

    The Arctic is a final garbage dump for ocean plastic

    The Arctic Ocean is a final resting place for plastic debris dumped into the North Atlantic Ocean, new research suggests.

    A 2013 circumpolar expedition discovered hundreds of tons of plastic debris, from fishing lines to plastic films, ecologist Andrés Cózar of the University of Cádiz in Spain and colleagues report April 19 in Science Advances. While many areas remain relatively...

    04/19/2017 - 14:10 Oceans, Pollution
  • News in Brief

    The Arctic is a final garbage dump for ocean plastic

    The Arctic Ocean is a final resting place for plastic debris dumped into the North Atlantic Ocean, new research suggests.

    A 2013 circumpolar expedition discovered hundreds of metric tons of plastic debris (some shown), from fishing lines to plastic films, ecologist Andrés Cózar of the University of Cádiz in Spain and colleagues report April 19 in Science Advances. While many areas remain...

    04/19/2017 - 14:10 Oceans, Pollution
  • News

    More than one ocean motion determines tsunami size

    Earthquake-powered shifts along the seafloor that push water forward, not just up, could help supersize tsunamis.

    By combining laboratory experiments, computer simulations and real-world observations, researchers discovered that the horizontal movement of sloped seafloor during an underwater earthquake can give tsunamis a critical boost. Scientists previously assumed that vertical...

    04/14/2017 - 07:00 Oceans, Earth