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E.g., 12/16/2017
E.g., 12/16/2017
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  • Larsen C ice shelf break
  • Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai
  • narwhals
Your search has returned 206 articles:
  • Year in Review

    The Larsen C ice shelf break has sparked groundbreaking research

    In 2015, glaciologist Daniela Jansen reported that a large rift was rapidly growing across one of the Antarctic Peninsula’s ice shelves, known as Larsen C. When the shelf broke, she and colleagues predicted, it would be the largest calving event in decades.

    It was. In July, a Delaware-sized iceberg split off from Larsen C  (SN: 8/5/17, p. 6). And researchers knew practically the moment...

    12/13/2017 - 08:30 Climate, Ecosystems, Oceans
  • News in Brief

    Watching this newborn island erode could tell us a lot about Mars

    NEW ORLEANS — Earth’s youngest bit of land is getting a new lease on life. When an erupting volcano birthed an island in the Pacific Ocean in late 2014, scientists thought waves would erode the island away within just a few months. Instead, new data suggest it could stick around for up to 30 years, researchers reported December 11 at a news conference at the American Geophysical Union’s fall...

    12/11/2017 - 17:48 Earth, Oceans, Planetary Science
  • News

    Narwhals react to certain dangers in a really strange way

    View the video

    When escaping from humans, narwhals don’t just freeze or flee. They do both.

    These deep-diving marine mammals have similar physiological responses to those of an animal frozen in fear: Their heart rate, breathing and metabolism slow, mimicking a “deer in the headlights” reaction. But narwhals (Monodon monoceros) take this freeze response to extremes. The animals...

    12/07/2017 - 14:41 Animals, Oceans, Physiology
  • News

    Most blue whales are ‘righties,’ except for this one move

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    Blue whales, it turns out, are a tad ambidextrous.

    When hunting in deep water, the whales tend to be “right-handed,” lunging at krill while twisting 180 degrees or less onto their right side. But when gobbling up the tiny crustaceans near the surface, the whales tend to be lefties, launching themselves upward while performing a 360-degree barrel roll to the left,...

    11/28/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Oceans, Ecology
  • News in Brief

    In the deep ocean, these bacteria play a key role in trapping carbon

    A mysterious group of microbes may be controlling the fate of carbon in the dark depths of the world’s oceans.

    Nitrospinae bacteria, which use the nitrogen compound nitrite to “fix” inorganic carbon dioxide into sugars and other compounds for food and reproduction, are responsible for 15 to 45 percent of such carbon fixation in the western North Atlantic Ocean, researchers report in the...

    11/28/2017 - 11:00 Oceans, Climate, Microbes
  • Reviews & Previews

    Climate foiled Europeans’ early exploration of North America

    A Cold WelcomeSam WhiteHarvard Univ., $29.95

    Many people may be fuzzy on the details of North America’s colonial history between Columbus’ arrival in 1492 and the Pilgrims’ landing on Plymouth Rock in 1620. But Europeans were actively attempting to colonize North America from the early 16th century onward, even though few colonies survived.

    As historian Sam White explains in A Cold...

    11/25/2017 - 08:00 Climate, History of Science, Oceans
  • News

    Wind may be driving the melting of East Antarctica’s largest glacier

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    The wind is helping to awaken one of Antarctica’s sleeping giants. Warm ocean waters, driven inland by winds, are undercutting an ice shelf that holds back a vast glacier from sliding into the ocean, researchers report November 1 in Science Advances.

    Totten Glacier is East Antarctica’s largest glacier, with a drainage basin encompassing about 550,000 square...

    11/01/2017 - 14:24 Earth, Climate, Oceans
  • Reviews & Previews

    Here’s the real story on jellyfish taking over the world

    SpinelessJuli BerwaldRiverhead Books, $27

    Jellyfish have gotten a bad rap. In recent years, concerns about rising jellyfish populations in some parts of the world have mushroomed into headlines like “Meet your new jellyfish overlords.” These floating menaces are taking over the world’s oceans thanks to climate change and ocean acidification, the thinking goes, and soon waters will...

    10/30/2017 - 12:18 Animals, Ecology, Oceans
  • Teaser

    A new material may one day keep mussels off piers and boat hulls

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    Shellfish stowaways on boat hulls could become castaways, thanks to a superslippery material.

    Crowds of mussels can grab onto ships, piers and other infrastructure. They slow down the boats they commandeer, and they’re expensive to remove. The hitchhikers can even travel to new places and become invasive species (SN: 3/18/17, p. 30). A new lubricant-infused material...

    10/24/2017 - 13:00 Biophysics, Materials, Oceans
  • Television

    ‘Killer Hurricanes’ reconstructs the past to predict storms of the future

    In 1780, a powerful hurricane swept across the islands of the Caribbean, killing an estimated 22,000 people; 5,000 more died of starvation and disease in the aftermath. “Our planet is capable of unleashing extreme chaos,” begins the new NOVA documentary “Killer Hurricanes,” set to air November 1 on PBS.

    To describe the human impact of such powerful tropical cyclones, the documentary...

    10/22/2017 - 08:00 Climate, Oceans, Science & Society