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Your search has returned 312 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Why people with celiac disease suffer so soon after eating gluten

    Researchers finally know why people with celiac disease get nauseous within hours of eating gluten.

    Some immune cells dump stomach-churning levels of immune chemicals called cytokines into the blood soon after the cells encounter gluten, triggering symptoms, scientists report August 7 in Science Advances.

    “When patients ate gluten, symptoms and cytokines went up at the same time,”...

    08/07/2019 - 14:00 Immune Science, Cells, Biomedicine
  • Teaser

    Giving cats food with an antibody may help people with cat allergies

    Cat lovers who sneeze and sniffle around their feline friends might one day find at least partial relief in a can of cat food.

    New research suggests that feeding cats an antibody to the major allergy-causing protein in cats renders some of the protein, called Fel d1, unrecognizable to the human immune system, reducing an allergic response. After 105 cats were fed the antibody for 10...

    07/26/2019 - 09:00 Immune Science, Science & Society
  • News

    Immune system defects seem to contribute to obesity in mice

    Subtle defects in the immune system may lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes, a study of mice suggests.

    Mice gained weight and developed health problems when they carried a genetic defect that dampens some immune functions, researchers report in the July 26 Science. The immune problems were linked to shifts in the gut microbiome — the collection of friendly bacteria and other microbes...

    07/25/2019 - 14:00 Microbiology, Immune Science, Physiology
  • Feature

    New approaches may help solve the Lyme disease diagnosis dilemma

    In 2005, Rachel Straub was a college student returning home from a three-week medical service mission in Central America. Soon after, she suffered a brutal case of the flu. Or so she thought.

     “We were staying in orphanages,” she says of her trip to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. “There were bugs everywhere. I remember going to the bathroom and the sinks would be solid bugs.” She plucked at...

    06/23/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Microbes, Immune Science
  • Editor's Note

    Science hasn’t managed to span the diagnosis gap

    Star Trek’s Dr. McCoy had no problem finding out what ailed his patients. He simply waved a handheld scanner over them, and the tricorder spat out a diagnosis — even if the patient was a Romulan.

    Earthbound diagnostics haven’t yet measured up to the extragalactic version, alas. Go to the doctor, and it’s likely to take a variety of tests to come up with a diagnosis. And even then,...

    06/17/2019 - 07:00 Science & Society, Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • Editor's Note

    Resurgence of measles is a tale as old as human history

    Late last year, researchers reported a discovery from a 5,000-year-old mass grave in Sweden: DNA from the bacterium that causes plague. The people in that grave were probably felled by an epidemic that spread via trade routes from southeastern Europe and contributed to sharp population declines across the continent (SN: 1/19/19, p. 12), a precursor to the Black Death that wiped out up...
    05/29/2019 - 15:28 Health, Immune Science, Science & Society
  • Feature

    How the battle against measles varies around the world

    The World Health Organization’s goal was lofty but achievable: eliminate measles from five of the world’s six regions by 2020. But recent outbreaks — even in places where elimination had been achieved — are making that goal a distant dream.

    In the first four months of 2019, 179 countries reported 168,193 cases of measles. That’s almost 117,000 more cases reported during the same period...

    05/21/2019 - 06:00 Science & Society, Immune Science, Health
  • News

    How allergens in pollen help plants do more than make you sneeze

    “Are plants trying to kill us?” allergy sufferers often ask Deborah Devis.

    A plant molecular geneticist at the University of Adelaide’s Waite campus in Australia, Devis should know the answer better than most. She is chugging through the last few months of a Ph.D. that involves predicting how grasses use pollen proteins that make people sneeze, wheeze and weep for days on end.

    What...

    05/19/2019 - 08:00 Health, Plants, Immune Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘An Elegant Defense’ explores the immune system’s softer side

    An Elegant DefenseMatt RichtelWilliam Morrow, $28.99

    We like to think of the immune system as our own personal military, ready to attack foreign invaders. Slice your finger, and immune cells rush in to destroy rogue pathogens.

    But it’s misleading to think of the immune system as solely a war machine. It must also keep the peace, assessing each threat and, in many cases,...

    04/23/2019 - 08:00 Immune Science, History of Science
  • News

    How helpful gut microbes send signals that they are friends, not foes

    Some gut bacteria really put the hooks into their host — but in a good way. Observations in mice show that certain filamentous microbes use a hooklike appendage to send messages that researchers believe are aimed at preventing immune cells from attacking the microbes.

    The finding, reported in the March 8 Science, could help explain how an immune system distinguishes friendly gut bacteria...

    03/07/2019 - 14:26 Cells, Immune Science, Microbiology