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E.g., 07/18/2019
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  • liquid droplets
  • supernova
  • crepes
Your search has returned 1938 articles:
  • News

    Permanent liquid magnets have now been created in the lab

    The rules about what makes a good magnet may not be as rigid as scientists thought. Using a mixture containing magnetic nanoparticles, researchers have now created liquid droplets that behave like tiny bar magnets.  

    Magnets that generate persistent magnetic fields typically are composed of solids like iron, where the magnetic poles of densely packed atoms are all locked in the same...

    07/18/2019 - 14:00 Materials, Physics
  • News

    Scientists still can’t agree on the universe’s expansion rate

    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — It’s one of the most talked-about issues in physics: Two measurements of the universe’s expansion rate disagree. Now, a technique that aimed to resolve the mismatch has produced a third estimate that falls between the previous two. So the controversy endures, scientists report in a study accepted in the Astrophysical Journal. 

    One measurement of how fast the...

    07/16/2019 - 14:01 Cosmology, Physics, Astronomy
  • For Daily Use

    A computer model explains how to make perfectly smooth crepes

    Perfect crepe-making is all in the wrist, according to physics.

    Using a computer simulation, two fluid dynamics researchers have devised a step-by-step guide for preparing perfectly flat crepes. Their strategy, described in the June Physical Review Fluids, involves tilting and rotating the frying pan in circles. Besides making picture-perfect pancakes, this technique might be useful for...

    06/19/2019 - 06:00 Physics
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers boggled by black hole behemoth

    Black hole bonanza

    The Event Horizon Telescope captured the first image of a black hole (shown on the cover of Science News at left). Data from the telescope array revealed that the behemoth, which resides at the center of the galaxy M87, is about 38 billion kilometers across and about 6.5 billion solar masses, Lisa Grossman and Emily Conover reported in “The first picture of a black hole...

    06/17/2019 - 07:15 Astronomy, Physics, Animals
  • News in Brief

    This tabletop device turns the quantum definition of a kilogram into a real mass

    It’s mass for the masses.

    A tabletop device makes the new definition of the kilogram more accessible. Previously, the kilogram had been equal to the mass of a special metal cylinder kept in a vault near Paris. But researchers did away with that standard on May 20, pegging the kilogram instead to a quantum mechanical number known as the Planck constant (SN Online: 5/20/19).

    Using...

    06/03/2019 - 07:00 Physics, Technology
  • News

    In a first, scientists took the temperature of a sonic black hole

    Taking a black hole’s temperature is a seemingly impossible task. But now, physicists report the next best thing. They’ve measured the temperature of a lab-made sonic black hole, which traps sound instead of light.

    If the result holds up, it will confirm a prediction of cosmologist Stephen Hawking, who first proposed a surprising truth about black holes: They aren’t truly black. Instead...

    05/29/2019 - 13:00 Physics, Quantum Physics, Condensed Matter
  • News

    100 years ago, an eclipse proved Einstein right. Today, black holes do too — for now

    A century ago, British astronomer Arthur Stanley Eddington and his colleagues photographed a solar eclipse, and changed the way humankind thought about the heavens.

    Those photographs, taken on May 29, 1919, from Sobral, Brazil and Príncipe Island off Africa’s west coast, affirmed for the first time a key prediction of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: Mass bends spacetime....

    05/29/2019 - 06:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    A new optical atomic clock’s heart is as small as a coffee bean

    Portable atomic clocks are on their way to an upgrade.

    Today’s small, battery-operated atomic clocks track time by counting oscillations of light absorbed by cesium atoms (SN: 9/4/04, p. 50). That light oscillates billions of times per second. Now, a miniature version of a type of atomic clock called an optical clock uses light tuned to rubidium atoms, and beats trillions of times per...

    05/28/2019 - 08:00 Physics, Technology
  • Context

    Murray Gell-Mann gave structure to the subatomic world

    In Bernard Malamud’s The Natural, Iris (played in the movie version by Glenn Close) tells Roy Hobbs that we all have two lives, “the life we learn with and the life we live with after that.”

    Murray Gell-Mann, the Nobel laureate physicist who died Friday, May 24, at age 89, also lived two lives. But both were spent learning — about how the world works.

    In his first life Gell-Mann...

    05/24/2019 - 17:09 History of Science, Physics
  • News

    Big black holes can settle in the outskirts of small galaxies

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Big galaxies like the Milky Way have correspondingly big black holes. But small galaxies might have massive ones, too. A new survey picked up dozens of massive black hole candidates in diminutive dwarf galaxies.

    Surprisingly, some of those potential black holes aren’t at their galaxy’s center, but instead appear to roam the outskirts, astronomer Amy Reines said May 20...

    05/23/2019 - 10:57 Physics, Astronomy