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  • vanishing woman
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Your search has returned 778 articles:
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Invisible Women’ spotlights a gaping and dangerous gender data gap

    Invisible WomenCaroline Criado PerezAbrams Press, $27

    The recent cancellation of the first all-female spacewalk occurred after the publication of Caroline Criado Perez’s Invisible Women. But the news — the lack of enough space suits for the women, suits which weren’t designed for the shape of women’s bodies in the first place — would fit right in to Criado Perez’s scathing takedown...

    04/19/2019 - 10:31 Science & Society, Health
  • News

    Immigrants pave the way for the gentrification of black neighborhoods

    Many think of gentrification today as wealthy, white millennials moving into low-income, minority neighborhoods and driving up housing costs. Yet a new study suggests that another group may play a key role in the process: immigrants.

    Gentrification, in which affluent outsiders settle and renovate rundown neighborhoods, generally decreases in white neighborhoods when immigrants from Asia...

    04/18/2019 - 08:00 Science & Society
  • News

    Statisticians want to abandon science’s standard measure of ‘significance’

    In science, the success of an experiment is often determined by a measure called “statistical significance.” A result is considered to be “significant” if the difference observed in the experiment between groups (of people, plants, animals and so on) would be very unlikely if no difference actually exists. The common cutoff for “very unlikely” is that you’d see a difference as big or bigger...

    04/17/2019 - 06:00 Science & Society
  • News

    Why some low-income neighborhoods are better than others

    Chicago’s mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot pledged in her victory speech on April 2 to “make Chicago a place where your zip code doesn’t determine your destiny.” But turning that pledge into reality will require addressing more than poverty, according to a study that followed the lives of thousands of children in the city.

    Kids from low-income neighborhoods that are beset by high rates of...

    04/12/2019 - 08:00 Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    The delight of discovering an asteroid that spits

    These are wondrous times for space exploration. Just when you think exploring the cosmos couldn’t possibly get more fun, another discovery delivers a new “oh wow” moment.

    Consider the asteroid Bennu. It’s an unprepossessing space rock that drew scientists’ curiosity because it is among the most pristine objects in our solar system, and it might provide clues to the origins of life....

    04/07/2019 - 07:15 Science & Society, Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    What we know and don’t know about how mass trauma affects mental health

    In March, three people connected to mass school shootings died by suicide, raising questions about the lingering effects of such trauma on a person’s mental health.

    Two teenagers who survived the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., took their own lives within days of each other. The father of a child killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School...

    04/03/2019 - 11:26 Psychology, Science & Society
  • News

    A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work

    Scientists are vigorously debating how, and if, they can put the human gene-editing genie back in the bottle.

    There is widespread agreement that it’s currently “irresponsible” to make heritable changes in human cells. Gene editors, even the much lauded CRISPR/Cas9 molecular scissors, have not yet been proven safe and effective enough to use to alter genes in the human germline; embryos,...

    04/02/2019 - 07:00 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    The science of CBD lags behind its marketing

    Treatments for pain and other common health problems often fall short, leading to untold misery and frustration. So it’s not hard to understand the lure of a treatment that promises to be benign, natural and good for just about everything that ails you. Enter cannabidiol, or CBD.

    So far, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved only one drug containing the chemical: a...

    03/27/2019 - 07:15 Science & Society, Neuroscience, Nutrition
  • Feature

    The CBD boom is way ahead of the science

    A few months back, a new storefront appeared in my small Oregon town. Its shelves were packed with tinctures, jars of salve, coffee beans, bath bombs — even beard oil. This motley collection shared a single star ingredient: CBD.

    Produced by the cannabis plant, CBD is the straitlaced cousin of marijuana’s more famous component — the THC that delivers a mind-swirling high. CBD, or...

    03/27/2019 - 06:00 Science & Society, Neuroscience, Mental Health
  • News

    The learning gap between rich and poor students hasn’t changed in decades

    The average performance of the lowest income students in the United States lags about three to four years behind that of the highest income students — an achievement gap that has remained constant for more than four decades, a new study finds.

    An analysis of standardized tests given to more than 2.7 million middle and high school students over almost 50 years suggests that federal...

    03/19/2019 - 10:11 Science & Society, Human Development