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E.g., 10/20/2017
E.g., 10/20/2017
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  • atomic clock
  • lasers
  • Jennifer Dionne
Your search has returned 845 articles:
  • Editor's Note

    Conspiring with engineers helps make science great

    From what I can tell, there’s a fair amount of friendly rivalry between folks who call themselves “scientists” and those who call themselves “engineers.” Bill Nye, educated as a mechanical engineer, had to defend himself as the “Science Guy” on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert earlier this year: “It’s physics, for four years, it’s physics,” he said. Dean of the Boston University College of...

    10/18/2017 - 12:30 Science & Society, Physics, Technology
  • Reviews & Previews

    New physics books don’t censor the math behind reality

    Many books about science are meant to be pleasure reading. Such books attempt to convey the wonder and fascination and excitement of science, and ideally some of the substance as well. After all, good popular science writing is not only engaging and entertaining, but also informative. But even very informative popular books are not designed to be fully educational about the science in...

    10/16/2017 - 15:00 Physics, Numbers
  • News

    New atomic clock is most precise yet

    A new model of atomic clock is now the world’s steadiest metronome, with a tick rate about six times more precise than the previous record-holder.

    This souped-up clock is an optical lattice — it measures time by counting the oscillations of light in a laser beam, which happen about 430 trillion times per second. Strontium atoms in the clock tick off each oscillation by absorbing and re-...

    10/05/2017 - 16:15 Technology, Physics
  • News

    Proton size still perplexes despite a new measurement

    Nonconformists could take a page from the proton’s playbook: The subatomic particle is once again resisting scientists’ attempts to size it up.

    Everyone agrees the proton is tiny: Its radius is less than a femtometer, or a trillionth of a millimeter. But scientists still don’t agree on exactly how small it is. A new measurement supports the case for a smaller proton, physicist Lothar...

    10/05/2017 - 14:00 Physics
  • Feature

    Jennifer Dionne harnesses light to illuminate nano landscapes

    Jennifer Dionne, 35Materials scientistStanford University

    To choose her research goals, Jennifer Dionne envisions conversations with hypothetical grandchildren, 50 years down the line. What would she want to tell them she had accomplished? Then, to chart a path to that future, “I work backward to figure out what are the milestones en route,” she says.

    That long-term vision has led the 35-...

    10/04/2017 - 13:52 Physics, Materials
  • News

    Trio wins physics Nobel Prize for gravitational wave detection

    View the video

    Subtle cosmic vibrations kicked up by swirling black holes have captured the public imagination — and the minds of the physics Nobel Prize committee members, too.

    Three scientists who laid the groundwork for the first direct detection of gravitational waves have won the Nobel Prize in physics. Rainer Weiss of MIT, and Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, both of Caltech,...

    10/03/2017 - 06:08 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    Trio of detectors tracks gravitational waves to their home

    The gravitational wave paparazzi have tracked down the cosmic neighborhood of two merging black holes. Scientists pinpointed the region in the sky where the two black holes violently melded and kicked up swirls of the spacetime ripples, locating their stomping grounds more precisely than ever before.

    Researchers from LIGO — the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory...

    09/27/2017 - 14:26 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    Turning up the heat on electrons reveals an elusive physics phenomenon

    When things heat up, spinning electrons go their separate ways.

    Warming one end of a strip of platinum shuttles electrons around according to their spin, a quantum property that makes them behave as if they are twirling around. Known as the spin Nernst effect, the newly detected phenomenon was the only one in a cadre of related spin effects that hadn’t previously been spotted,...

    09/26/2017 - 12:00 Condensed Matter, Physics
  • News

    Molecules face the big chill

    Molecules are seriously chilling out. Scientists report the first cooling of molecules below a previously impassable milestone. The result, in which scientists cooled molecules down to tens of millionths of a degree, is a step toward reaching the ultracold temperatures already achievable with atoms, researchers report August 28 in Nature Physics.

    Scientists regularly chill atoms to less...

    08/28/2017 - 12:41 Physics
  • How Bizarre

    Scientists create the most cubic form of ice crystals yet

    Cube-shaped ice is rare, at least at the microscopic level of the ice crystal. Now researchers have coaxed typically hexagonal 3-D ice crystals to form the most cubic ice ever created in the lab.

    Cubed ice crystals — which may exist naturally in cold, high-altitude clouds — could help improve scientists’ understanding of clouds and how they interact with Earth’s atmosphere and sunlight,...

    08/28/2017 - 07:00 Physics