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E.g., 08/23/2017
E.g., 08/23/2017
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  • nano monster truck
  • photo illustration of people transmitting signals
  • tiny transistor
Your search has returned 844 articles:
  • The –est

    Meet the Bobcat Nanowagon, the world’s smallest monster truck

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The world’s smallest monster truck has a chemical curiosity under its hood.

    Made out of a mere five molecules, the Ohio Bobcat Nanowagon checks in at 3.5 nanometers long and 2.5 wide — about the width of a DNA strand. Even so, it was the heftiest contender in the first-ever nanocar race earlier this year. This pip-squeak vehicle took home the bronze, but perhaps more...

    08/23/2017 - 17:21 Technology
  • News

    New antennas are up to a hundredth the size of today’s devices

    Antennas just got a whole lot smaller.

    Tiny chips that communicate via radio waves are a tenth to a hundredth the length of current state-of-the-art compact antennas. At only a couple hundred micrometers across — comparable to the thickness of a piece of paper — these next-gen antennas can relay the same types of signals as those used by TVs, cell phones and radios, researchers report...

    08/22/2017 - 14:00 Technology, Materials
  • The –est

    The incredible shrinking transistor just got smaller

    Carbon nanotubes may be the key to shrinking down transistors and squeezing more computer power into less space.

    Historically, the number of transistors that can be crammed onto a computer chip has doubled every two years or so, a trend known as Moore’s law. But that rule seems to be nearing its limit: Today's silicon transistors can’t get much smaller than they already are.

    Carbon...

    07/19/2017 - 07:00 Technology, Computing
  • Science Ticker

    CRISPR adds storing movies to its feats of molecular biology

    Short film is alive and well. Using the current trendy gene-editing system CRISPR, a team from Harvard University has encoded images and a short movie into the DNA of living bacteria.

    The work is part of a larger effort to use DNA to store data — from audio recordings and poetry to entire books on synthetic biology. Last year, Seth Shipman and his colleagues at Harvard threw CRISPR into...

    07/12/2017 - 19:09 Genetics, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Gecko-inspired robot grippers could grab hold of space junk

    View the video

    Get a grip. A new robotic gripping tool based on gecko feet can grab hold of floating objects in microgravity. The grippers could one day help robots move dangerous space junk to safer orbits or climb around the outside of space stations.

    Most strategies for sticking don’t work in space. Chemical adhesives can’t withstand the wide range of temperatures, and suction...

    06/28/2017 - 14:08 Robotics, Astronomy, Technology
  • The –est

    New video camera captures 5 trillion frames every second

    View the video

    A new video camera, the fastest by far, has set a staggering speed record. It films 5 trillion frames (equivalent to 5 trillion still images) every second, blowing away the 100,000 frames per second of high-speed commercial cameras. The device could offer a peek at never-before-seen phenomena, such as the blazingly fast chemical reactions that drive explosions or...

    06/13/2017 - 04:00 Technology
  • News in Brief

    New pelvic exoskeleton stops people from taking tumbles

    View the video

    A wearable robot could prevent future falls among those prone to stumbles.

    The new exoskeleton packs motors on a user’s hips and can sense blips in balance. In a small trial, the pelvic robot performed well in sensing and averting wearers’ slips, researchers report May 11 in Scientific Reports.

    Exoskeletons have the potential to help stroke victims and people...

    05/11/2017 - 09:00 Technology, Biomedicine
  • Science Ticker

    Trackers may tip a warbler’s odds of returning to its nest

    Strapping tiny trackers called geolocators to the backs of birds can reveal a lot about where the birds go when they migrate, how they get there and what happens along the way. But ornithologists are finding that these cool backpacks could have not-so-cool consequences.

    Douglas Raybuck of Arkansas State University and his colleagues outfitted some Cerulean warblers (Setophaga cerulea)...

    05/05/2017 - 14:30 Animals, Technology
  • News in Brief

    New printer creates color by shaping nanostructures

    Carving nanostructures with a laser creates long-lasting colors.

    Researchers developed the new printing technique as an alternative to ink-based printing, in which colors fade with time. Aside from eternally vibrant art, the technique could lead to new types of color displays or improve security labels, the scientists report in the May 5 Science Advances.

    Anders Kristensen of...

    05/05/2017 - 14:00 Technology, Physics
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers concerned about cancer’s sugary disguise

    Sugarcoated

    A new wave of potential immune therapies aims to target the network of complex sugars that coat cancer cells, Esther Landhuis reported in “Cancer’s sweet cloak” (SN: 4/1/17, p. 24). Some of these sugars, called sialic acids, help tumors hide from the immune system.

    “Are the offending sugars referred to in this article the ones we are eating or are they the result of...

    05/03/2017 - 11:20 Cancer, Technology, Animals