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E.g., 06/22/2018
E.g., 06/22/2018
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  • Koko the gorilla
  • four cups of coffee
  • general relativity
Your search has returned 110307 articles:
  • News

    Koko the gorilla is gone, but she left a legacy

    When Koko died in her sleep in California on June 19, people throughout the world immediately began mourning the gorilla.

    Koko was a charmer and undeniably smart. She took an unusual route to fame. Stanford University graduate student Francine Patterson started teaching Koko a version of sign language in 1972, the year after the infant ape was born. Patterson rapidly developed a deep...

    06/21/2018 - 17:35 Anthropology, Animals
  • News in Brief

    Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heart

    Coffee revs up cell’s energy factories and helps hearts recover from heart attacks, a study of mice suggests.

    In the study, researchers gave mice the equivalent of four cups of coffee a day for 10 days before inducing heart attacks in the rodents. Cells in mice that got caffeine repaired the heart attack damage better than cells in mice that didn’t get caffeine, researchers report June...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells, Physiology
  • News in Brief

    Einstein’s general relativity reigns supreme, even on a galactic scale

    Chalk up another win for Einstein’s seemingly invincible theory of gravity. A new study shows that the theory of general relativity holds true even over vast distances.

    General relativity prevailed within a region spanning a galactic distance of about 6,500 light-years, scientists report in the June 22 Science. Previously, researchers have precisely tested the theory by studying its...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genes

    Turning on genes may work like forming a flash mob.

    Inside a cell’s nucleus, fast-moving groups of floppy proteins crowd together around gene control switches and coalesce into droplets to turn on genes, Ibrahim Cissé of MIT and colleagues report June 21 in two papers in Science.

    Researchers have previously demonstrated that proteins form such droplets in the cytoplasm, the cell’s...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells
  • News

    A 2,200-year-old Chinese tomb held a new gibbon species, now extinct

    A royal crypt from China’s past has issued a conservation alert for apes currently eking out an existence in East Asia.

    The partial remains of a gibbon were discovered in 2004 in an excavation of a 2,200- to 2,300-year-old tomb in central China’s Shaanxi Province. Now, detailed comparisons of the animal’s face and teeth with those of living gibbons show that the buried ape is from a...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • Science Ticker

    Splitting families may end, but migrant kids’ trauma needs to be studied

    Faced with a growing outcry against separating migrant children from their families at the U.S. border — including this statement from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine — President Trump reversed course June 20 and issued an executive order aimed at keeping detained families together.

    Scientists, armed with evidence that traumatic events early in life can have...

    06/20/2018 - 17:39 Neuroscience, Psychology, Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    How to help your toddler be helpful (with caveats)

    Getting help from a toddler is a bit like not getting help: They mean well, but you may end up with more of a mess than when you started.

    But given the choice, many kids prefer “real” activities to imaginary games, Bruce Bower recently reported in depth for Science News. And the benefits of recruiting your child for help with chores may go beyond conquering that pile of laundry: Research...

    06/20/2018 - 10:00 Parenting, Child Development
  • The –est

    Each year painted lady butterflies cross the Sahara — and then go back again

    Move over, monarchs. The painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) now boasts the farthest known butterfly migration.

    Though found across the world, the orange-and-brown beauties that live in Southern Europe migrate into Africa each fall, crossing the Sahara on their journey (SN Online: 10/12/16). But what happened after was a mystery because the butterflies disappeared. Researchers...

    06/20/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Ecology, Ecosystems
  • News

    With this new system, robots can ‘read’ your mind

    Getting robots to do what we want would be a lot easier if they could read our minds.

    That sci-fi dream might not be so far off. With a new robot control system, a human can stop a bot from making a mistake and get the machine back on track using brain waves and simple hand gestures. People who oversee robots in factories, homes or hospitals could use this setup, to be presented at the...

    06/20/2018 - 00:00 Robotics, Technology
  • News

    To combat an expanding universe, aliens could hoard stars

    Survivalists prep for disaster by stocking up on emergency food rations. Aliens, on the other hand, might hoard stars.

    To offset a future cosmic energy shortage caused by the accelerating expansion of the universe, a super-advanced civilization could pluck stars from other galaxies and bring them home, theoretical astrophysicist Dan Hooper proposes June 13 at arXiv.org.

    It’s a far-...

    06/19/2018 - 14:50 Physics, Astronomy