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E.g., 12/15/2017
E.g., 12/15/2017
Your search has returned 5699 images:
  • MRI images of brains
  • Kepler 90 system
Your search has returned 109756 articles:
  • Scicurious

    Even brain images can be biased

    An astonishing number of things that scientists know about brains and behavior are based on small groups of highly educated, mostly white people between the ages of 18 and 21. In other words, those conclusions are based on college students.

    College students make a convenient study population when you’re a researcher at a university. It makes for a biased sample, but one that’s still...

    12/15/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Human Development
  • News

    AI has found an 8-planet system like ours in Kepler data

    Our solar system is no longer the sole record-holder for most known planets circling a star.

    An artificial intelligence algorithm sifted through data from the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope and discovered a previously overlooked planet orbiting Kepler 90 — making it the first star besides the sun known to host eight planets. This finding, announced in a NASA teleconference...

    12/14/2017 - 20:10 Exoplanets, Artificial Intelligence, Astronomy, Technology
  • News

    These weather events turned extreme thanks to human-driven climate change

    NEW ORLEANS — For the first time, scientists have definitively linked human-caused climate change to extreme weather events.

    A handful of extreme events that occurred in 2016 — including a deadly heat wave that swept across Asia — simply could not have happened due to natural climate variability alone, three new studies find. The studies were part of a special issue of the Bulletin of...

    12/14/2017 - 16:53 Climate, Earth
  • News

    Saturn’s rings are surprisingly young and may be from shredded moons

    NEW ORLEANS — Saturn’s iconic rings are a recent addition. Final data from the Cassini spacecraft, which flew between the planet and the rings this year before plunging into the gas giant’s atmosphere, show the rings are around a few hundred million years old and less massive than previously thought.

    Those findings suggest the rings are probably the remnants of at least one moon, rather...

    12/14/2017 - 15:30 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • News

    U.S. religion is increasingly polarized

    There’s both inspiring and troubling news for holiday worshippers.

    Unlike other historically Christian Western nations, the United States is not losing its religion, say sociologists Landon Schnabel of Indiana University Bloomington and Sean Bock of Harvard University. But America is becoming as polarized religiously as it is politically, the researchers report online November 27 in...

    12/14/2017 - 11:51 Science & Society
  • News

    In a tally of nerve cells in the outer wrinkles of the brain, a dog wins

    If more nerve cells mean more smarts, then dogs beat cats, paws down, a new study on carnivores shows. That harsh reality may shock some friends of felines, but scientists say the real surprises are inside the brains of less popular carnivores. Raccoon brains are packed with nerve cells, for instance, while brown bear brains are sorely lacking.

    By comparing the numbers of nerve cells, or...

    12/14/2017 - 09:00 Neuroscience, Animals
  • Growth Curve

    An abundance of toys can curb kids’ creativity and focus

    The holiday onslaught is upon us. For some families with children, the crush of holiday gifts — while wonderful and thoughtful in many ways — can become nearly unmanageable, cluttering both rooms and minds.

    This year, I’m striving for simplicity as I pick a few key presents for my girls. I will probably fail. But it’s a good goal, and one that has some new science to back it. Toddlers...

    12/14/2017 - 07:00 Child Development, Parenting
  • News

    Fracking linked to low birth weight in Pennsylvania babies

    Living near a fracking site appears to be detrimental to infant health, a study eyeing the gas production practice in Pennsylvania suggests.

    Babies of moms living within one kilometer of a hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, site in the state had a 25 percent greater chance of being born underweight than did babies whose moms lived at least three kilometers away, researchers report online...

    12/13/2017 - 17:55 Health, Pollution
  • News in Brief

    Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn

    NEW ORLEANS — National flood maps are underestimating the risk for tens of millions of people in the United States. That’s the conclusion of researchers presenting a new study December 11 at the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting.

    The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency estimates that about 13 million people live in a “1-in-100-year” floodplain zone, a region that has a 1...

    12/13/2017 - 15:13 Earth, Climate
  • News

    Electric eels provide a zap of inspiration for a new kind of power source

    New power sources bear a shocking resemblance to the electricity-making organs inside electric eels.

    These artificial electric eel organs are made up of water-based polymer mixes called hydrogels. Such soft, flexible battery-like devices, described online October 13 in Nature, could power soft robots or next-gen wearable and implantable tech.

    “It’s a very smart approach” to...

    12/13/2017 - 13:22 Technology, Chemistry, Materials