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E.g., 06/27/2018
E.g., 06/27/2018
Your search has returned 6147 images:
  • whale skeleton, formanifera skeletons, and a rhinoceros beetle exoskeleton
  • Pluto
  • interior of a car
Your search has returned 110224 articles:
  • Reviews & Previews

    Skeletons come in many shapes and sizes

    SkeletonsJan Zalasiewicz and Mark WilliamsOxford Univ., $24.95

    For much of life’s reign on Earth, organisms got by without skeletons. But since that innovation evolved about 550 million years ago, there’s been an evolutionary arms race of epic proportions.

    One of the first competitors was Cloudina, a small seafloor creature whose exterior skeleton almost certainly evolved in...

    05/27/2018 - 08:00 Evolution, Animals, Paleontology
  • Context

    Pluto’s demotion ignores astronomical history

    If Dr. Seuss had been an astronomer, Horton the Elephant (who heard a Who) would have said “a planet’s a planet, no matter how small.”

    Even Pluto.

    But don’t quote Dr. Seuss to the International Astronomical Union. In 2006, the IAU declared Pluto a planet not. 

    IAU Resolution B5 (not to be confused with Le Petit Prince’s asteroid B 612) declared that in order to be considered...

    05/25/2018 - 13:08 Astronomy, History of Science, Planetary Science
  • For Daily Use

    Even in the shade, a car’s interior can get lethally hot

    Don’t count on a shady parking spot to save a child left in the back seat on a hot day.

    A new analysis of temperatures inside parked cars reveals that a toddler in a sunbathed vehicle would reach lethal body temperatures faster than one left in the shade. But even in a shaded car, a child could die from overheating within a few hours, researchers report online May 23 in Temperature.

    ...
    05/25/2018 - 09:00 Health, Technology
  • News

    Here’s what we know about the deadly Nipah virus

    KOCHI, India — The rare and deadly Nipah virus has emerged in southern India, killing at least 11 people and causing more than 25 others to be hospitalized. Although global health officials consider that, so far, to be a relatively small outbreak, they’re worried.

    Nipah is on the World Health Organization’s priority list of emerging diseases that could cause a global pandemic, alongside...

    05/25/2018 - 07:00 Health
  • News

    How birds may have escaped the dino-killing asteroid impact

    Nothing against trees. But maybe it’s better not to get too dependent on them if you want to survive a big flaming space object crashing into Earth.

    The asteroid impact that caused a mass extinction 66 million years probably also triggered the collapse of forests worldwide, a new investigation of the plant fossil record concludes. Needing trees and extensive plant cover for nesting or...

    05/24/2018 - 17:44 Paleontology
  • News

    The Chicxulub asteroid impact might have set off 100,000 years of global warming

    After a giant asteroid hit Earth about 66 million years ago, the planet’s climate went on a roller coaster ride.

    The space rock’s impact set off tsunamis and wildfires before climate-chilling clouds of sulfur gas engulfed the planet for decades, wiping out most life (SN: 11/25/17, p. 14). As these clouds dissipated, billions of tons of carbon dioxide, which spewed into the atmosphere...

    05/24/2018 - 15:13 Paleontology, Oceans, Climate
  • News in Brief

    Pregnant bonobos get a little delivery help from their friends

    Like humans, African apes called bonobos may treat birth as a social event with a serious purpose.

    In three recorded instances in captivity, female bonobos stood close by and provided protection and support to a bonobo giving birth to a healthy infant. Female bystanders also gestured as if ready to hold an infant before it was born, or actually held one as it was born, scientists report...

    05/24/2018 - 13:26 Animals, Anthropology, Evolution
  • News

    Plasma rain in the sun’s atmosphere falls in surprising places

    LEESBURG, Va. — Coronal rain may have a finer grain.

    A search for plasma precipitation in the sun’s atmosphere reveals that the rain turns up in unexpected places. That discovery might mean the rain can fall as a fine mist as well as a shower, new data suggest. Ultimately, tracing the movement of this plasma could help solve the mystery of why the solar atmosphere, or corona, is so hot...

    05/24/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    As CO2 increases, rice loses B vitamins and other nutrients

    By the end of this century, rice may not deliver the same B vitamin levels that it does today. Protein and certain minerals will dwindle, too, new data suggest.

    Testing higher carbon dioxide concentrations in experimental rice paddies in China predicts losses in four vitamins — B1, B2, B5 and B9 — an international team reports May 23 in Science Advances. Adding results from similar...

    05/23/2018 - 16:17 Climate, Agriculture
  • News in Brief

    Fleets of self-driving taxis could be choreographed to cut traffic

    Self-driving taxis that use an algorithm to work together like a well-oiled machine could someday cut down on city traffic.

    Researchers have created a computer program that can continually analyze incoming ride-hailing requests sent from a smartphone app and plot the most efficient course for each car in a self-driving fleet to take (SN Online: 11/21/17). Unlike standard taxis, which...

    05/23/2018 - 13:00 Technology, Science & Society