Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Search Content

E.g., 09/25/2018
E.g., 09/25/2018
Your search has returned 6490 images:
  • color plot
  • Tosanoides aphrodite
  • supernova
Your search has returned 110587 articles:
  • News

    Here’s why we care about attempts to prove the Riemann hypothesis

    A famed mathematical enigma is once again in the spotlight.

    The Riemann hypothesis, posited in 1859 by German mathematician Bernhard Riemann, is one of the biggest unsolved puzzles in mathematics. The hypothesis, which could unlock the mysteries of prime numbers, has never been proved. But mathematicians are buzzing about a new attempt.

    Esteemed mathematician Michael Atiyah took a...

    09/25/2018 - 11:46 Numbers
  • Introducing

    This new fish species displays a splash of highlighter hues

    A new species of reef fish is a real head turner. 

    Last year while surveying a remote coral reef about 130 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, ichthyologists Luiz Rocha and Hudson Pinheiro spotted a radiant fish hiding in a drab rock crevice.  

    “It was like finding a bright emerald in a coal mine,” recalls Pinheiro.

    The fish, with its electric-pink-and-yellow body...

    09/25/2018 - 10:22 Animals
  • News

    Astronomers may have spotted the birth of a neutron star

    For the first time, astronomers may have watched a massive stellar explosion give rise in real time to a superdense dead star called a neutron star.

    New observations of supernova 2012au show charged oxygen and sulfur atoms fleeing the scene of the explosion at 2,300 kilometers per second. That suggests the shells of gas surrounding the dense remains of the original star are being lit up...

    09/25/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    The first rovers to explore an asteroid just sent photos home

    The first rovers to explore the surface of an asteroid have landed. After touching down September 21, the vehicles took pictures of asteroid Ryugu and at least one hopped around.

    Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft, which arrived at the near-Earth asteroid on June 27 after a journey of more than three years, released the MINERVA-II1 container from a height of about 60 meters (SN Online: 6/27/18...

    09/24/2018 - 18:30 Planetary Science
  • News

    A paralyzed man makes great strides with spinal stimulation and rehab

    With the help of a spine stimulator and intensive training, a formerly paralyzed man can command his legs to step again. This achievement, described online September 24 in Nature Medicine, inches researchers closer to restoring movement to paraplegic people.

    The therapy allows 29-year-old Jered Chinnock to control his leg movements with his thoughts. “This is highly significant,” study...

    09/24/2018 - 14:41 Neuroscience
  • News

    In lab tests, this gene drive wiped out a population of mosquitoes

    A new gene drive may push a species of malaria-carrying mosquito to extinction.

    In a small-scale laboratory study, the genetic engineering tool caused Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to stop producing offspring in eight to 12 generations, researchers report September 24 in Nature Biotechnology. If the finding holds up in larger studies, the gene drive could be the first capable of wiping...

    09/24/2018 - 11:20 Genetics, Ecology
  • News in Brief

    Japan has launched a miniature space elevator

    A pair of tiny satellites that will help test technology for a space elevator is on its way to the International Space Station.

    At 1:52 p.m. EDT on September 22, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched a rocket carrying the STARS-Me experiment from the island of Tanegashima.

    STARS-Me (or Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite – Mini elevator), built by engineers at...

    09/24/2018 - 09:50 Astronomy
  • Science Visualized

    How math helps explain the delicate patterns of dragonfly wings

    The dainty veins gracing the wings of dragonflies and other insects are like fingerprints: Each wing displays a distinct pattern. A randomized mathematical process may help explain how certain thin filaments, called secondary veins, form these complex patterns, a new study finds.

    Insect wings consist of two types of veins, both of which provide structural support (SN: 6/24/17, p. 5)....

    09/23/2018 - 08:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • Teaser

    These new superthin antennas are made from metallic nanomaterials

    A new design for lightweight, flexible antennas, made from metallic 2-D materials, could one day be used connect household appliances and wearable devices to the internet (SN: 6/9/18, p. 18).

    Researchers created the antennas, described online September 21 in Science Advances, using a water-based ink containing 1-nanometer-thick flakes of titanium carbide. The ink can be sprayed, painted...

    09/21/2018 - 14:00 Technology
  • News

    The way hunter-gatherers share food shows how cooperation evolved

    East African Hadza hunter-gatherers are neither generous nor stingy. But the groups they live in are. That pattern highlights a flexible and underappreciated form of cooperation that may have helped humans go from mobile bands to industrialized states, researchers say.

    Some camps share food more than others, but Hadza circulate among all camps rather than clustering in the most...

    09/21/2018 - 13:31 Anthropology, Evolution