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E.g., 11/17/2017
E.g., 11/17/2017
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  • hippocampal nerve cells
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Your search has returned 554 articles:
  • 50 years ago, artificial limbs weren’t nearly as responsive

    Electric limbs

    Very subtle control of artificial limbs by means of a tiny electronic device may become possible.… [The] electronic device … [is] designed to be injected into a muscle through a thick hypodermic needle. A tiny package strapped to the outside of the limb will beam radio waves at the device, which will return them, modified by the electric current produced in the muscle. — ...

    11/16/2017 - 08:00 Technology, Neuroscience
  • News

    Study casts doubt on whether adult brain’s memory-forming region makes new cells

    In stark contrast to earlier findings, adults do not produce new nerve cells in a brain area important to memory and navigation, scientists conclude after scrutinizing 54 human brains spanning the age spectrum.

    The finding is preliminary. But if confirmed, it would overturn the widely accepted and potentially powerful idea that in people, the memory-related hippocampus constantly churns...

    11/16/2017 - 06:00 Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    The brain’s helper cells have a hand in learning fear

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — Helper cells in the brain just got tagged with a new job — forming traumatic memories.

    When rats experience trauma, cells in the hippocampus — an area important for learning — produce signals for inflammation, helping to create a potent memory. But most of those signals aren’t coming from the nerve cells, researchers reported November 15 at the Society for Neuroscience...

    11/15/2017 - 14:30 Neuroscience
  • Science Visualized

    See these first-of-a-kind views of living human nerve cells

    The human brain is teeming with diversity. By plucking out delicate, live tissue during neurosurgery and then studying the resident cells, researchers have revealed a partial cast of neural characters that give rise to our thoughts, dreams and memories. 

    So far, researchers with the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle have described the intricate shapes and electrical properties...

    11/09/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Cells
  • News

    Alzheimer’s protein can travel from blood to build up in the brain

    An Alzheimer’s-related protein can move from the blood to the brain and accumulate there, experiments on mice show for the first time.

    The results, published online October 31 in Molecular Psychiatry, suggest that the protein amyloid-beta outside the brain may contribute to the Alzheimer’s disease inside it, says Mathias Jucker, a neurobiologist at the University of Tübingen in Germany....

    11/06/2017 - 06:00 Neuroscience, Physiology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers question photons colliding, black sea snakes and more

    Brain boost

    It’s possible that therapies such as external brain stimulation and neurofeedback, as well as some drugs, may one day boost brain flexibility. A new line of research suggests flexibility is important for learning, Laura Sanders reported in “Learning takes brain acrobatics” (SN: 9/16/17, p. 22).

    Online reader Glenn wondered if drugs for Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s...

    10/18/2017 - 12:15 Particle Physics, Animals, Neuroscience
  • News

    To understand the origins of pain, ask a flatworm

    Hydrogen peroxide, a molecule produced by cells under duress, may be a common danger signal, helping to alert animals to potential harm and send them scurrying. New details from planarian flatworms of how this process works may deepen scientists’ understanding of how people detect pain, and may ultimately point to better ways to curb it.

    “Being able to get a big-picture view of how these...

    10/16/2017 - 12:46 Animals, Neuroscience, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    There’s no rest for the brain’s mapmakers

    The brain’s mapmakers don’t get a break, even for sleep. Grid cells, specialized nerve cells that help keep people and other animals oriented, stay on the clock 24/7, two preliminary studies on rats suggest. Results from the studies, both posted October 5 at bioRxiv.org, highlight the stability of the brain’s ‘inner GPS’ system.

    Nestled in a part of the brain called the medial entorhinal...

    10/12/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • Reviews & Previews

    New book offers a peek into the mind of Oliver Sacks

    The River of ConsciousnessOliver SacksKnopf, $27

    The experience of reading the essays that make up The River of Consciousness is very much like peering into an ever-changing stream. Pebbles shift as the water courses by, revealing unexpected facets below.

    The essays, by neurologist Oliver Sacks and arranged into an anthology two weeks before his death in 2015, meander through such...

    10/06/2017 - 09:00 Neuroscience, History of Science, Human Evolution
  • Feature

    Kay Tye improvises to understand our inner lives

    Kay Tye, 36NeuroscientistMIT

    Here are some of the things Kay Tye relishes: break dancing, rock-climbing, snowboarding, poker, raising her young daughter and son. These adrenaline-fueled activities all require basic skills. But true mastery — and the joy Tye finds in them — comes from improvisation. She boldly steps into a void, a realm where she has to riff, and trusts that a flash of insight...

    10/04/2017 - 13:46 Neuroscience