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E.g., 02/23/2018
E.g., 02/23/2018
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  • MRI scans of brains of healthy and stroke patients
  • brain
  • Alzheimer's protein
Your search has returned 573 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Babies can recover language skills after a left-side stroke

    AUSTIN, Texas — Babies’ stroke-damaged brains can pull a mirror trick to recover.

    A stroke on the left side of the brain often damages important language-processing areas. But people who have this stroke just before or after birth recover their language abilities in the mirror image spot on the right side, a study of teens and young adults shows. Those patients all had normal language...

    02/18/2018 - 15:45 Neuroscience
  • News

    To hear the beat, your brain may think about moving to it

    If you’ve ever felt the urge to tap along to music, this research may strike a chord.

    Recognizing rhythms doesn’t involve just parts of the brain that process sound — it also relies on a brain region involved with movement, researchers report online January 18 in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. When an area of the brain that plans movement was disabled temporarily, people...

    02/16/2018 - 10:49 Neuroscience, Clinical Trials
  • News

    Cutting off a brain enzyme reversed Alzheimer’s plaques in mice

    Knocking back an enzyme swept mouse brains clean of protein globs that are a sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Reducing the enzyme is known to keep these nerve-damaging plaques from forming. But the disappearance of existing plaques was unexpected, researchers report online February 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

    The brains of mice engineered to develop Alzheimer’s disease were...

    02/14/2018 - 13:12 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    The wiring for walking developed long before fish left the sea

    View the video

    These fins were made for walking, and that’s just what these fish do — thanks to wiring that evolved long before vertebrates set foot on land.

    Little skates use two footlike fins on their undersides to move along the ocean floor. With an alternating left-right stride powered by muscles flexing and extending, the movement of these fish looks a lot like that of many...

    02/08/2018 - 17:40 Neuroscience, Evolution
  • News in Brief

    Watch nerve cells being born in the brains of living mice

    View the video

    Brain scientists have filmed a first-of-a-kind birth video. It reveals specialized cells in the brains of mice dividing to create newborn nerve cells.

    The images, published in the Feb. 9 Science, show intricacies of how certain parts of the adult mouse brain can churn out new nerve cells. These details may help lead to a deeper understanding of the role of this nerve...

    02/08/2018 - 14:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    A blood test could predict the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    A new blood test might reveal whether someone is at risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.

    The test measures blood plasma levels of a sticky protein called amyloid-beta. This protein can start building up in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients decades before there’s any outward signs of the disease. Typically, it takes a brain scan or spinal tap to discover these A-beta clumps, or plaques,...

    02/01/2018 - 16:03 Neuroscience, Biomedicine, Health
  • Editor's Note

    Memory remains elusive, but the search continues

    In Theaetetus, Plato likened memory to a wax tablet, which would adopt the image of whatever was impressed upon it. Aristotle is said to have called memory “the scribe of the soul.” Others have viewed memory as a stomach, storehouse or switchboard, while acknowledging that it sometimes seems like a leaky bucket.

    St. Augustine and Robert Hooke also thought deeply about memory. But...

    01/24/2018 - 13:35 Science & Society, History of Science, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    Somewhere in the brain is a storage device for memories

    People tend to think of memories as deeply personal, ephemeral possessions — snippets of emotions, words, colors and smells stitched into our unique neural tapestries as life goes on. But a strange series of experiments conducted decades ago offered a different, more tangible perspective. The mind-bending results have gained unexpected support from recent studies.

    In 1959, James Vernon...

    01/24/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Cilia in the brain may be busier than previously thought

    Nerve cells in the brain make elaborate connections and exchange lightning-quick messages that captivate scientists. But these cells also sport simpler, hairlike protrusions called cilia. Long overlooked, the little stubs may actually have big jobs in the brain.

    Researchers are turning up roles for nerve cell cilia in a variety of brain functions. In a region of the brain linked to...

    01/19/2018 - 13:16 Neuroscience, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    Protein helps old blood age the brains of young mice

    Old blood can prematurely age the brains of young mice, and scientists may now be closer to understanding how. A protein located in the cells that form a barrier between the brain and blood could be partly to blame, experiments on mice suggest.  

    If something similar happens in humans, scientists say, methods for countering the protein may hold promise for treating age-related brain...

    01/11/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience