Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 11/20/2017
E.g., 11/20/2017
Your search has returned 245 images:
  • colliding black holes
  • Millennium Bridge
  • Great Pyramid of Giza
Your search has returned 850 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    Colliding black holes are reported for a fifth time

    Spacetime ripples from black holes are becoming routine.

    For a fifth time, scientists have reported the detection of two colliding black holes via their gravitational waves, tiny vibrations that warp the fabric of spacetime. Unlike previous gravitational wave detections, which were heralded with news conferences often featuring panels of scientists squinting at journalists under bright...

    11/16/2017 - 11:40 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    Why the wiggle in a crowd’s walk can put a wobble in a bridge

    View the video

    Some bridges could really put a swing in your step.

    Crowds walking on a bridge can cause it to sway — sometimes dangerously. Using improved simulations to represent how people walk, scientists have now devised a better way to calculate under what conditions this swaying may arise, researchers report November 10 online in Science Advances.

    When a bridge —...

    11/10/2017 - 14:00 Physics
  • News

    Mystery void is discovered in the Great Pyramid of Giza

    High-energy particles from outer space have helped uncover an enigmatic void deep inside the Great Pyramid of Giza.

    Using high-tech devices typically reserved for particle physics experiments, researchers peered through the thick stone of the largest pyramid in Egypt for traces of cosmic rays and spotted a previously unknown empty space. The mysterious cavity is the first major structure...

    11/02/2017 - 08:00 Archaeology, Physics, Technology
  • News in Brief

    This is the lightest robot that can fly, swim and take off from water

    View the video

    A new insect-inspired tiny robot that can move between air and water is a lightweight.

    Weighing the same as about six grains of rice, it is the lightest robot that can fly, swim and launch itself from water, an international team of researchers reports October 25 in Science Robotics. The bot is about 1,000 times lighter than other previously developed aerial-aquatic...

    10/25/2017 - 16:05 Robotics, Technology, Physics
  • News in Brief

    Light’s weird dual nature weathers trip to space and back

    Light is two-faced: Sometimes it behaves like a wave, sometimes like a particle. Now, scientists have shown that light’s shifty disposition persists even after trekking thousands of kilometers into space and back again, researchers report October 25 in Science Advances.

    Depending on how light is measured, it can either be particle-like, lighting up a camera pixel, for example, or...

    10/25/2017 - 14:00 Quantum Physics, Physics
  • Editor's Note

    Conspiring with engineers helps make science great

    From what I can tell, there’s a fair amount of friendly rivalry between folks who call themselves “scientists” and those who call themselves “engineers.” Bill Nye, educated as a mechanical engineer, had to defend himself as the “Science Guy” on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert earlier this year: “It’s physics, for four years, it’s physics,” he said. Dean of the Boston University College of...

    10/18/2017 - 12:30 Science & Society, Physics, Technology
  • Reviews & Previews

    New physics books don’t censor the math behind reality

    Many books about science are meant to be pleasure reading. Such books attempt to convey the wonder and fascination and excitement of science, and ideally some of the substance as well. After all, good popular science writing is not only engaging and entertaining, but also informative. But even very informative popular books are not designed to be fully educational about the science in...

    10/16/2017 - 15:00 Physics, Numbers
  • News

    New atomic clock is most precise yet

    A new model of atomic clock is now the world’s steadiest metronome, with a tick rate about six times more precise than the previous record-holder.

    This souped-up clock is an optical lattice — it measures time by counting the oscillations of light in a laser beam, which happen about 430 trillion times per second. Strontium atoms in the clock tick off each oscillation by absorbing and re-...

    10/05/2017 - 16:15 Technology, Physics
  • News

    Proton size still perplexes despite a new measurement

    Nonconformists could take a page from the proton’s playbook: The subatomic particle is once again resisting scientists’ attempts to size it up.

    Everyone agrees the proton is tiny: Its radius is less than a femtometer, or a trillionth of a millimeter. But scientists still don’t agree on exactly how small it is. A new measurement supports the case for a smaller proton, physicist Lothar...

    10/05/2017 - 14:00 Physics
  • Feature

    Jennifer Dionne harnesses light to illuminate nano landscapes

    Jennifer Dionne, 35Materials scientistStanford University

    To choose her research goals, Jennifer Dionne envisions conversations with hypothetical grandchildren, 50 years down the line. What would she want to tell them she had accomplished? Then, to chart a path to that future, “I work backward to figure out what are the milestones en route,” she says.

    That long-term vision has led the 35-...

    10/04/2017 - 13:52 Physics, Materials