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E.g., 01/19/2018
E.g., 01/19/2018
Your search has returned 135 images:
  • DNA robot illustration
  • synthetic cartilage
  • Ptiloris paradiseus
Your search has returned 139 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    A robotic arm made of DNA moves at dizzying speed

    A new robotic arm made of DNA moves 100,000 times faster than previous DNA machinery.

    The DNA nanobot is shaped like a gearshift, with an extendible arm that ranges from 25 to more than 400 nanometers long that’s attached to a 55-by-55-nanometer platform. Researchers remotely control this DNA device, described in the Jan. 19 Science, with electric fields that tug on charged molecules in...

    01/18/2018 - 14:00 Biophysics, Technology
  • News

    This artificial cartilage gets its strength from the stuff in bulletproof vests

    A new kind of artificial cartilage, made with the same kind of fiber that fortifies bulletproof vests, is proving stronger than others.

    The fabricated material mimics the stiffness, toughness and water content of natural cartilage, researchers report in the Jan. 4 Advanced Materials. This synthetic tissue could replace the cartilage in a person’s body that naturally wears down and heals...

    01/10/2018 - 07:00 Materials, Biophysics
  • Science Visualized

    Why some birds of paradise have ultrablack feathers

    Some birds of paradise really know how to work their angles. Tilted, microscopic filaments in some of the showy birds’ black feathers make that plumage look much darker than traditional black feathers, researchers report online January 9 in Nature Communications.

    Dakota McCoy, an evolutionary biologist at Harvard University, and colleagues measured how much light each type of black...

    01/09/2018 - 11:44 Animals, Biophysics
  • It's Alive

    Robot fish shows how the deepest vertebrate in the sea takes the pressure

    It’s like having “an elephant stand on your thumb.”

    That’s how deep-sea physiologist and ecologist Mackenzie Gerringer describes the pressure squeezing down on the deepest known living fish, some 8 kilometers down. What may help these small, pale Mariana snailfish survive elephantine squashing, says Gerringer of the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Labs, is a body bulked up,...

    01/03/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Biophysics, Physiology
  • News

    Scallops’ amazing eyes use millions of tiny, square crystals to see

    There’s stiff competition for the most elaborate eyeballs in the animal kingdom, but a mollusk that turns up on dinner plates might be a finalist.

    Each of a scallop’s eyes — it has up to 200 of them, each about a millimeter in diameter — contains millions of perfectly square, flat crystals that build up into a mirrored mosaic, new research shows. And that shiny surface is curved in a way...

    11/30/2017 - 14:08 Animals, Biophysics
  • It's Alive

    Studying giant tortoise flips without tipping the animals over is a delicate business

    It would be a memorable sight. But it would also be so wrong to tip over Galápagos giant tortoises to see how shell shape affects their efforts to leg-pump, neck-stretch and rock right-side up again.

    Shell shape matters, says evolutionary biologist Ylenia Chiari, though not the way she expected. It’s taken years, plus special insights from a coauthor who more typically studies scorpions...

    11/30/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Biophysics, Evolution
  • News

    Crested pigeons sound the alarm with their wings

    Crested pigeons communicate without even opening their beaks. The birds have a built-in alarm system that’s set off by fluttering feathers when flying away from danger, researchers report November 9 in Current Biology.

    In animals, nonvocal sounds are not uncommon. “All animals produce sound as we move, even humans, and that sound can be useful to those that hear it,” says study coauthor...

    11/09/2017 - 13:28 Animals, Biophysics, Evolution
  • Mystery Solved

    Leafhoppers use tiny light-absorbing balls to conceal their eggs

    Nature has no shortage of animal camouflage tricks. One newly recognized form of deception, used by plant-eating insects called leafhoppers, was thought to have a whole different purpose.

    Leafhoppers are found worldwide in temperate and tropical regions. Most of the insects, of which there are about 20,000 described species, produce small quantities of microspheres called brochosomes —...

    11/03/2017 - 06:00 Animals, Biophysics, Technology
  • News

    Nanoscale glitches let flowers make a blue blur that bees can see

    A bit of imperfection could be perfect for flowers creating a “blue halo” effect that bees can see.

    At least a dozen families of flowering plants, from hibiscuses to daisy relatives, have a species or more that can create a bluish-ultraviolet tinge using arrays of nanoscale ridges on petals, an international research team reports online October 18 in Nature. These arrays could be the...

    10/25/2017 - 10:00 Biophysics, Plants, Animals
  • Teaser

    A new material may one day keep mussels off piers and boat hulls

    View the video

    Shellfish stowaways on boat hulls could become castaways, thanks to a superslippery material.

    Crowds of mussels can grab onto ships, piers and other infrastructure. They slow down the boats they commandeer, and they’re expensive to remove. The hitchhikers can even travel to new places and become invasive species (SN: 3/18/17, p. 30). A new lubricant-infused material...

    10/24/2017 - 13:00 Biophysics, Materials, Oceans