Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 01/19/2018
E.g., 01/19/2018
Your search has returned 170 images:
  • Two brothers mummies
  • dead sea scroll caves
  • CT scans of Homo sapiens fossils
Your search has returned 355 articles:
  • News

    DNA solves the mystery of how these mummies were related

    A pair of ancient Egyptian mummies, known for more than a century as the Two Brothers, were actually half brothers, a new study of their DNA finds.

    These two, high-ranking men shared a mother, but had different fathers, say archaeogeneticist Konstantina Drosou of the University of Manchester in England and her colleagues. That muted family tie came to light thanks to the successful...

    01/16/2018 - 07:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • How the Dead Sea Scrolls survived a war in the 1960s

    Dead Sea Scrolls safe

    The famous Dead Sea Scrolls, rumored lost or damaged during the June war between Israel and Egypt, are safe, according to Antiquity…. On the eve of the war they were packed up and put safely in a strong room in the basement of the Palestine Archaeological Museum (Rockefeller Museum), according to a reliable authority. —  Science News, January 20, 1968

    Update...
    01/04/2018 - 12:30 Archaeology
  • Year in Review

    The story of humans’ origins got a revision in 2017

    Human origins are notoriously tough to pin down. Fossil and genetic studies in 2017 suggested a reason why: No clear starting time or location ever existed for our species. The first biological stirrings of humankind occurred at a time of evolutionary experimentation in the human genus, Homo.

    Homo sapiens’ signature skeletal features emerged piece by piece in different African...

    12/13/2017 - 08:29 Human Evolution, Ancestry, Archaeology
  • News

    Strong-armed women helped power Europe’s ancient farming revolution

    Ancient farm women in Central Europe labored so vigorously at grinding grain, tilling soil and other daily tasks that the women’s average upper-arm strength surpassed that of top female rowers today, a new study finds.

    In the early stages of farming more than 7,000 years ago, women engaged in a wide array of physically intense activities that were crucial to village life but have...

    11/29/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Hidden hoard hints at how ancient elites protected the family treasures

    BOSTON — Long before anyone opened a bank account or rented a safe deposit box, wealth protection demanded a bit of guile and a broken beer jug. A 3,100-year-old jewelry stash was discovered in just such a vessel, unearthed from an ancient settlement in Israel called Megiddo in 2010. Now the find is providing clues to how affluent folk hoarded their valuables at a time when fortunes rested on...

    11/27/2017 - 14:00 Archaeology
  • News

    Skeletons could provide clues to who wrote or protected the Dead Sea Scrolls

    BOSTON — A decades-long debate over who once occupied a settlement located near the caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found has taken a chaste turn.

    Analyses of 33 newly excavated skeletons of people buried at the West Bank site, Qumran, supports a view that the community consisted of a religious sect of celibate men. Anthropologist Yossi Nagar of the Israel Antiquities Authority in...

    11/17/2017 - 14:05 Archaeology
  • Feature

    How Asian nomadic herders built new Bronze Age cultures

    Nomadic herders living on western Asia’s hilly grasslands made a couple of big moves east and west around 5,000 years ago. These were not typical, back-and-forth treks from one seasonal grazing spot to another. These people blazed new trails.

    A technological revolution had transformed travel for ancient herders around that time. Of course they couldn’t make online hotel reservations....

    11/15/2017 - 12:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Genetics
  • News

    Ancient European farmers and foragers hooked up big time

    Thousands of years ago, hunter-gatherers native to Europe and incoming farmers from what’s now Turkey got up close and personal for a surprisingly long time, researchers say. This mixing reshaped the continent’s genetic profile differently from one region to another.

    Ancient DNA from foragers and farmers in eastern, central and western Europe indicates that they increasingly mated with...

    11/10/2017 - 07:00 Anthropology, Archaeology, Genetics
  • News

    Mystery void is discovered in the Great Pyramid of Giza

    High-energy particles from outer space have helped uncover an enigmatic void deep inside the Great Pyramid of Giza.

    Using high-tech devices typically reserved for particle physics experiments, researchers peered through the thick stone of the largest pyramid in Egypt for traces of cosmic rays and spotted a previously unknown empty space. The mysterious cavity is the first major structure...

    11/02/2017 - 08:00 Archaeology, Physics, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Europe’s Stone Age fishers used beeswax to make a point

    Late Stone Age people got a grip thanks to honeybees. Northern Europeans attached a barbed bone point to a handle of some kind with a beeswax adhesive around 13,000 years ago, scientists say. The result: a fishing spear.

    Using beeswax glue to make tools was common in Africa as early as 40,000 years ago (SN: 8/25/12, p. 16). But this spear is the first evidence of its use in cold parts of...

    10/06/2017 - 16:17 Archaeology, Human Evolution