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E.g., 12/17/2017
E.g., 12/17/2017
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  • illustration of a superconductor
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Your search has returned 44 articles:
  • News

    Some high-temperature superconductors might not be so odd after all

    A misfit gang of superconducting materials may be losing their outsider status.

    Certain copper-based compounds superconduct, or transmit electricity without resistance, at unusually high temperatures. It was thought that the standard theory of superconductivity, known as Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, couldn’t explain these oddballs. But new evidence suggests that the standard theory...

    12/08/2017 - 07:00 Condensed Matter, Physics, Materials
  • News

    Photons are caught behaving like superconducting electrons

    Light is a fan of the buddy system. Photons, or particles of light, have been spotted swapping energy with partners. This chummy behavior resembles how electrons pair up in materials that conduct current without resistance, known as superconductors, researchers report in a paper accepted in Physical Review Letters.

    Although the photons exchange energy like electrons do, it’s unknown...

    10/30/2017 - 15:21 Condensed Matter, Quantum Physics
  • News

    Turning up the heat on electrons reveals an elusive physics phenomenon

    When things heat up, spinning electrons go their separate ways.

    Warming one end of a strip of platinum shuttles electrons around according to their spin, a quantum property that makes them behave as if they are twirling around. Known as the spin Nernst effect, the newly detected phenomenon was the only one in a cadre of related spin effects that hadn’t previously been spotted,...

    09/26/2017 - 12:00 Condensed Matter, Physics
  • News

    How to peel permanent marker off glass

    View the video

    Permanent markers aren’t so permanent after all. All that’s required to peel the ink from glass is the surface tension of water and a little patience, scientists report.

    When glass marked with permanent ink is slowly dipped in water, the writing lifts off the glass and floats intact atop the water. For the first time, scientists have now explained the physics behind...

    09/14/2017 - 07:00 Condensed Matter
  • News

    Majorana fermion detected in a quantum layer cake

    A particle that is its own antiparticle seems to have left its calling card within a solid material.

    To observe the signature of that particle, a Majorana fermion, scientists coupled a thin film of a topological insulator — which conducts electricity on its edges but is insulating within — with a layer of a superconductor, in which electrons can flow without resistance. In this layer...

    07/20/2017 - 15:58 Condensed Matter
  • News

    Faux particles commit physics faux pas

    A weird new particle imitator flouts the established rules of particle physics. The discovery could help scientists simulate how particles behaved just after the Big Bang or lead to the development of new devices with unusual electromagnetic properties.

    The curious new phenomenon involves a particle-like entity called a quasiparticle, formed from a jostling mosh pit of electrons that...

    06/12/2017 - 03:00 Condensed Matter
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers question supernova physics

    Supernova surprise

    Astronomers continue to learn a lot from supernova 1987A, which burst onto the scene 30 years ago. Thanks to new detectors that can pick up neutrino signals and even gravitational waves, scientists will be ready when the next nearby star explodes, Emily Conover reported in “Waiting for a supernova” (SN: 2/18/17, p. 24).

    Steve Capps wondered how neutrinos inside an...

    03/22/2017 - 12:10 Particle Physics, Robotics, Condensed Matter
  • News in Brief

    Single-atom magnets store bits of data

    NEW ORLEANS — ­The tiniest electronic gadgets have nothing on a new data-storage device. Each bit is encoded using the magnetic field of a single atom — making for extremely compact data storage, although researchers have stored only two bits of data so far.

    “If you can make your bit smaller, you can store more information,” physicist Fabian Natterer of the École Polytechnique Fédérale...

    03/20/2017 - 16:25 Physics, Technology, Condensed Matter
  • News

    Superfluid helium behaves like black holes

    NEW ORLEANS — Black holes and superfluids make for strange bedfellows: One is famous for being so dense that light can’t escape, and the other is a bizarre liquid that flows without friction. But new computer simulations confirm that superfluid helium follows an unusual rule known from black holes — one with mysterious significance for physics.

    Scientists demonstrated that entropy, a...

    03/16/2017 - 11:13 Physics, Condensed Matter
  • News in Brief

    New form of hydrogen created

    Scientists have produced a new form of hydrogen in the lab — negatively charged hydrogen clusters.

    Each cluster consists of hydrogen molecules arranged around a negatively charged hydrogen ion — a single hydrogen atom with an extra electron — at temperatures near absolute zero, the researchers report in the Dec. 30 Physical Review Letters. Similar, positively charged ion clusters have...

    01/09/2017 - 14:50 Physics, Chemistry, Condensed Matter