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Your search has returned 728 articles:
  • Science & the Public

    HPV vaccine as cancer prevention is a message that needs to catch on

    Cancer prevention isn’t the first thing that comes to many parents’ minds when they consider vaccinating their preteens against human papillomavirus, or HPV. And the fact that HPV is transmitted sexually gives the vaccine more baggage than a crowded international flight. But what gets lost in the din is the goal of vaccination, to protect adolescents from infection with HPV types that are...

    04/28/2017 - 12:00 Science & Society, Health, Cancer
  • Growth Curve

    Long naps lead to less night sleep for toddlers

    Like most moms and dads, my time in the post-baby throes of sleep deprivation is a hazy memory. But I do remember feeling instant rage upon hearing a popular piece of advice for how to get my little one some shut-eye: “sleep begets sleep.” The rule’s reasoning is unassailable: To get some sleep, my baby just had to get some sleep. Oh. So helpful. Thank you, lady in the post office and entire...

    04/26/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Health
  • Growth Curve

    Evidence is lacking that ‘cocooning’ prevents whooping cough in newborns

    Last week, I wrote about how powerfully protective whooping cough vaccines can be when babies receive their first dose before even being born, from their pregnant mothers-to-be. As I was looking through that study, another of its findings struck me: Babies didn’t seem to get any extra whooping cough protection when their moms were vaccinated after giving birth.

    I wondered if this meant...

    04/20/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Health
  • News

    Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

    Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

    Hospital admission rates for heart attacks...

    04/12/2017 - 16:48 Health, Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough

    When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My “I” turned into “we,” as in, “What are we going to eat for dinner?” and, “Should we sit in that hot tub?” I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. Doctors recommend that women receive a dose...

    04/12/2017 - 09:00 Human Development, Health
  • News

    Common virus may be celiac disease culprit

    A common and usually harmless virus may trigger celiac disease. Infection with the suspected culprit, a reovirus, could cause the immune system to react to gluten as if it was a dangerous pathogen instead of a harmless food protein, an international team of researchers reports April 7 in Science.

    In a study in mice, the researchers found that the reovirus, T1L, tricks the immune system...

    04/06/2017 - 14:03 Health, Immune Science
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, contraception options focused on women

    Next in birth control

    The pill is a sledgehammer approach to contraception.... A second-generation of [drugs] is being designed to do the job without upsetting a woman’s normal cycle of ovulation and menstruation.... A contraceptive administered to the man can be given only for a short time without actually affecting the development of sperm … and, therefore, is not being considered for...

    04/06/2017 - 07:00 Health, Biomedicine, Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    Language heard, but never spoken, by young babies bestows a hidden benefit

    The way babies learn to speak is nothing short of breathtaking. Their brains are learning the differences between sounds, rehearsing mouth movements and mastering vocabulary by putting words into meaningful context. It’s a lot to fit in between naps and diaper changes.

    A recent study shows just how durable this early language learning is. Dutch-speaking adults who were adopted from South...

    04/05/2017 - 14:00 Human Development, Health
  • Science & the Public

    When coal replaces a cleaner energy source, health is on the line

    Where I grew up in Tennessee, a coal-fired power plant perches by the river, just down from the bridge that my wild brothers and their friends would jump off in the summer. Despite the proximity, I never thought too much about the power plant and the energy it was churning out.

    But then I read an April 3 Nature Energy paper on coal-fired energy production that used my town — and others...

    04/04/2017 - 14:30 Pollution, Health
  • News

    Getting dengue first may make Zika infection much worse

    Being immune to a virus is a good thing, until it’s not. That’s the lesson from a study that sought to understand the severity of the Zika outbreak in Brazil. Experiments in cells and mice suggest that a previous exposure to dengue or West Nile can make a Zika virus infection worse.

    “Antibodies you generate from the first infection … can facilitate entry of the Zika virus into...

    03/30/2017 - 16:26 Biomedicine, Health, Immune Science