Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 09/25/2017
E.g., 09/25/2017
Your search has returned 158 images:
  • Viking raid illustrated
  • pictures from Santa Elina rock shelter
  • notched sloth bones
Your search has returned 343 articles:
  • News

    Skeleton ignites debate over whether women were Viking warriors

    Viking warriors have a historical reputation as tough guys, with an emphasis on testosterone. But scientists now say that DNA has unveiled a Viking warrior woman who was previously found in a roughly 1,000-year-old grave in Sweden. Until now, many researchers assumed that “she” was a “he” buried with a set of weapons and related paraphernalia worthy of a high-ranking military officer.

    If...

    09/13/2017 - 15:49 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • Science Ticker

    People may have lived in Brazil more than 20,000 years ago

    People hunted giant sloths in the center of South America around 23,120 years ago, researchers say — a find that adds to evidence that humans reached South America well before Clovis hunters roamed North America roughly 13,000 years ago.

    Evidence of people’s presence at Santa Elina rock shelter, located in a forested part of central-west Brazil, so long ago raises questions about how...

    09/05/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News in Brief

    People may have lived in Brazil more than 20,000 years ago

    People hunted giant sloths in the center of South America around 23,120 years ago, researchers say — a find that adds to evidence that humans reached South America well before Clovis hunters roamed North America 13,000 years ago.

    Evidence of people’s presence at Santa Elina rock-shelter, in central-west Brazil, so long ago raises questions about how people first entered South America....

    09/05/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Fiery re-creations show how Neandertals could have easily made tar

    Neandertals took stick-to-itiveness to a new level. Using just scraps of wood and hot embers, our evolutionary cousins figured out how to make tar, a revolutionary adhesive that they used to make formidable spears, chopping tools and other implements by attaching sharp-edged stones to handles, a new study suggests.

    Researchers already knew that tar-coated stones date to at least 200,000...

    08/31/2017 - 09:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient mud documents the legacy of Rome’s lead pipes

    Just as modern cities struggle with lead pollution, so may have ancient Rome. And muddy waters preserved the city’s legacy of lead pipes, a new study suggests.

    Researchers examined lead levels in dirt drilled from two Roman harbor sites, Ostia and Portus, on the Tiber River. The samples spanned 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000. Up until around 200 B.C., harbor waters were pristine, but then...

    08/28/2017 - 16:36 Archaeology, Pollution
  • News

    Some secrets of China’s terra-cotta army are baked in the clay

    China’s first emperor broke the mold when he had himself buried with a terra-cotta army. Now insight into the careful crafting of those soldiers is coming from the clays used to build them. Custom clay pastes were mixed at a clay-making center and then distributed to specialized workshops that cranked out thousands of the life-size figures, new research suggests.

    Roughly 700,000...

    08/22/2017 - 09:30 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Sacrificed dog remains feed tales of Bronze Age ‘wolf-men’ warriors

    Remains of at least two Late Bronze Age initiation ceremonies, in which teenage boys became warriors by eating dogs and wolves, have turned up in southwestern Russia, two archaeologists say. The controversial finds, which date to between roughly 3,900 and 3,700 years ago, may provide the first archaeological evidence of adolescent male war bands described in ancient texts.

    Select boys of...

    08/07/2017 - 07:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Humans first settled in Australia as early as 65,000 years ago

    Tools, paints and other artifacts excavated from an ancient rock-shelter in northern Australia are giving new glimpses into early life Down Under. The first humans may have arrived on the continent 65,000 years ago — 5,000 years earlier than previously thought — and they were sophisticated craftspeople, researchers report July 19 in Nature.

    Archaeologists unearthed three distinct layers...

    07/19/2017 - 13:00 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • News

    Dog domestication happened just once, ancient DNA study suggests

    People and pooches may have struck up a lasting friendship after just one try, a new genetic study suggests.

    New data from ancient dogs indicates that dogs became distinct from wolves between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago, researchers report July 18 in Nature Communications. Dogs then formed genetically distinct eastern and western groups 17,000 to 24,000 years ago, the researchers...

    07/18/2017 - 11:18 Genetics, Animals, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Copper in Ötzi the Iceman’s ax came from surprisingly far away

    Ötzi the Iceman’s copper ax was imported.

    The mummy’s frozen body and assorted belongings were found in 1991 poking out of an Alpine glacier at Italy’s northern border with Austria. But Ötzi’s ax originated about 500 kilometers to the south in what is now central Italy’s Southern Tuscany region, say geoscientist Gilberto Artioli of the University of Padua in Italy and colleagues. It’s...

    07/14/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology