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  • News

    Gun owner or not, Americans agree on many ways to limit gun violence

    Despite a public debate that grows more fractious with every school shooting — from Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., to Parkland, Fla., and the latest deadly attack May 18 in Santa Fe, Texas — Americans actually agree on gun policy to a surprising extent.  

    According to a new survey of more than 2,100 people, majorities of both gun owners and nonowners support 15 potential gun...

    05/21/2018 - 13:23 Psychology, Science & Society
  • For Daily Use

    The CDC advises: Don’t swallow the water in a hotel swimming pool

    It’s vacation season — time for swimming pools, hot tubs and waterparks. But you might want to think twice before getting wet, says a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    From 2000 to 2014, public health officials from 46 states and Puerto Rico reported 493 outbreaks associated with treated recreational water, resulting in more than 27,000 illnesses and...

    05/18/2018 - 07:00 Health, Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    Satellite data backs theory of North Korean nuclear site collapse

    A new analysis of satellite images and seismic waves from North Korea’s nuclear test site support theories that the underground facility has at least partially collapsed.

    Seismologists across the world have been tracking the clandestine nuclear weapons program for years by analyzing vibrations that emanate from explosions at the test site under Mount Mantap (SN: 8/5/17, p. 18). Now,...

    05/10/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    Does our latest issue look fat? If so, that’s a good thing

    Subscribers to Science News may note that this special double issue is a lot heftier than the usual magazine, boasting more than 20 pages of advertisements. That’s up from 13 pages in last spring’s expanded issue.

    Indeed, our ace marketing department sold so many ads that we had to include more articles, which, as anyone in print publishing will tell you, is a very nice problem to...

    05/02/2018 - 07:15 Science & Society
  • News

    New genetic sleuthing tools helped track down the Golden State Killer suspect

    Using DNA to find a killer sounds easy: Upload some DNA to a database, get a match and — bingo — suspect found. But it took new genetic sleuthing tools to track down the man suspected of being the Golden State Killer.

    Investigators have confirmed they used a public genealogy database, GEDmatch, to connect crime scene evidence to distant relatives of Joseph James DeAngelo. The 72-year-old...

    04/29/2018 - 09:49 Genetics, Science & Society
  • News

    Website privacy policies don’t say much about how they share your data

    If you want to know how a website shares your personal data, you might be tempted to slog through its online privacy policy. Be prepared for disappointment. Website privacy policies explicitly disclose only a fraction of sites’ data-sharing practices, according to new research that casts doubt on whether users can make informed decisions about their online activity.

    The research,...

    04/27/2018 - 07:00 Technology, Science & Society
  • Scicurious

    Want to build a dragon? Science is here for you

    No fantasy world is complete without a fire-breathing dragon. SpaceX founder Elon Musk even wants to make a cyborg version a reality, or so he tweeted April 25. But if someone was going to make a dragon happen, how would it get its flame? Nature, it seems, has all the parts a dragon needs to set the world on fire, no flamethrower required. The creature just needs a few chemicals, some microbes...

    04/26/2018 - 12:15 Chemistry, Science & Society
  • For Daily Use

    Private web browsing doesn’t mean no one is watching

    Take a quiz on web privacy

    Private web browsing isn’t nearly as private as many people think.

    Major web browsers, such as Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari, offer a private browsing option, sometimes known as “incognito.” The option allows people to surf the internet through a private window that doesn’t log activity into the browser’s history or influence future autofill...

    04/24/2018 - 15:30 Technology, Science & Society
  • Context

    Informed wisdom trumps rigid rules when it comes to medical evidence

    Everybody agrees that medical treatments should be based on sound evidence. Hardly anybody agrees on what sort of evidence counts as sound.

    Sure, some people say the “gold standard” of medical evidence is the randomized controlled clinical trial. But such trials have their flaws, and translating their findings into sound real-world advice isn’t so straightforward. Besides, the best...

    04/23/2018 - 07:00 Science & Society, Clinical Trials, Biomedicine
  • Science Visualized

    Closing the gender gap in some science fields may take over 100 years

    If you’re a female computer scientist, you may not see an equal number of men and women working in your field in this century — or even the next one. It might take a whopping 280 years for that scientific discipline to bridge the gender gap, researchers report online April 19 in PLOS Biology.

    The study predicts when the gender gap will close in science, technology, engineering, math and...

    04/20/2018 - 13:19 Science & Society