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  • macrophages and heart cells
  • Hawk moth
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Your search has returned 176 articles:
  • News

    Immune cells play surprising role in steady heartbeat

    Immune system cells may help your heart keep the beat. These cells, called macrophages, usually protect the body from invading pathogens. But a new study published April 20 in Cell shows that in mice, the immune cells help electricity flow between muscle cells to keep the organ pumping.

    Macrophages squeeze in between heart muscle cells, called cardiomyocytes. These muscle cells...

    04/20/2017 - 12:35 Cells, Microbiology
  • Mystery Solved

    Hawk moths convert nectar into antioxidants

    Hawk moths have a sweet solution to muscle damage.

    Manduca sexta moths dine solely on nectar, but the sugary liquid does more than fuel their bodies. The insects convert some of the sugars into antioxidants that protect the moths’ hardworking muscles, researchers report in the Feb. 17 Science.

    When animals expend a lot of energy, like hawk moths do as they rapidly beat their wings...

    04/17/2017 - 07:00 Ecology, Microbiology
  • Feature

    CRISPR had a life before it became a gene-editing tool

    It is the dazzling star of the biotech world: a powerful new tool that can deftly and precisely alter the structure of DNA. It promises cures for diseases, sturdier crops, malaria-resistant mosquitoes and more. Frenzy over the technique — known as CRISPR/Cas9 — is in full swing. Every week, new CRISPR findings are unfurled in scientific journals. In the courts, universities fight over patents...

    04/05/2017 - 09:00 Cells, Microbiology, Molecular Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient dental plaque tells tales of Neandertal diet and disease

    Dental plaque preserved in fossilized teeth confirms that Neandertals were flexible eaters and may have self-medicated with an ancient equivalent of aspirin.

    DNA recovered from calcified plaque on teeth from four Neandertal individuals suggest that those from the grasslands around Beligum’s Spy cave ate woolly rhinoceros and wild sheep, while their counterparts from the forested El...

    03/08/2017 - 13:22 Archaeology, Microbiology, Evolution
  • News in Brief

    Cold plasma puts the chill on norovirus

    WASHINGTON — A nasty stomach virus that can linger on fruits and veggies may have met its match in cold plasma.

    In experiments, the ionized gas, created by filtering room-temperature air through an electric field, virtually eliminated norovirus from lettuce, researchers reported February 7 at the American Society for Microbiology Biothreats meeting.

     Norovirus is the leading cause...

    02/10/2017 - 07:00 Health, Microbiology
  • News in Brief

    Zika virus ‘spillback’ into primates raises risk of future human outbreaks

    WASHINGTON — Scientists usually worry that animal diseases could spill over into humans. But “spillback” of Zika virus into monkeys in South America could be just as dangerous.

    In areas where Zika infections are prevalent among humans and mosquitoes are abundant, the virus may be transmitted to wild primates, disease ecologist Barbara Han said February 6 at the American Society for...

    02/08/2017 - 14:00 Ecology, Microbiology
  • Science Visualized

    Map of Zika virus reveals how it shifts as it matures

    Before an immature Zika virus becomes infectious, it does some major remodeling.

    In a fledgling virus particle, the inner protein and RNA core (shown in dark blue above, right) forms bridges to the membrane layer that surrounds it. As the virus matures, the core shuffles around and the bridges melt away (below, right).

    It’s the first time scientists have seen such rearrangement in...

    01/31/2017 - 07:00 Microbiology, Health
  • Science Ticker

    Why salmonella doesn’t want you to poop out

    Salmonella bacteria don’t want your body to starve on their account. The microbes’ motives, though, are (probably) purely poop-related.

    The body sometimes sacrifices appetite to fight off infection: Less energy for the host also means less energy for the pathogen. Understanding how bacteria cope with this tactic can inform treatments.

    When it reaches the gut, Salmonella enterica ...

    01/27/2017 - 15:00 Microbiology, Health
  • News

    What a mosquito's immune system can tell us about fighting malaria

    Immune cells in a malaria-transmitting mosquito sense the invading parasites and deploy an army of tiny messengers in response. These couriers help turn on a mosquito’s defenses, killing off the parasites, a new study suggests.

    This more detailed understanding of the mosquito immune system, published January 20 in Science Immunology, might help scientists design new ways to combat...

    01/20/2017 - 14:00 Immune Science, Microbiology
  • Feature

    Year in review: ‘Minimal genome’ makes its debut

    One of biology’s biggest achievements of 2016 was intentionally as small as possible: building a bacterium with only 473 genes. That pint-size genetic blueprint, the smallest for any known free-living cell, is a milestone in a decades-long effort to create an organism containing just the bare essentials necessary to exist and reproduce. Such “minimal genome” cells might eventually serve as...

    12/14/2016 - 07:36 Microbiology, Genetics, Cells