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E.g., 04/27/2018
E.g., 04/27/2018
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  • nerve cells in hippocampi
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  • News in Brief

    Male fruit flies enjoy ejaculation

    Moody red lighting in a lab is helping researchers figure out what fruit flies like best about sex.

    The question has arisen as scientists try to tease out the neurobiological steps in how the brain’s natural reward system can get hijacked in alcoholism, says neuroscientist Galit Shohat-Ophir of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel.

    Male fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster)...

    04/19/2018 - 12:00 Animals, Neuroscience
  • News

    Human brains make new nerve cells — and lots of them — well into old age

    Your brain might make new nerve cells well into old age.

    Healthy people in their 70s have just as many young nerve cells, or neurons, in a memory-related part of the brain as do teenagers and young adults, researchers report in the April 5 Cell Stem Cell. The discovery suggests that the hippocampus keeps generating new neurons throughout a person’s life.

    The finding contradicts a...

    04/05/2018 - 14:50 Neuroscience, Human Development, Cells
  • News in Brief

    This ancient lizard may have watched the world through four eyes

    About 50 million years ago, a monitor lizard in what is now Wyoming perceived the world through four eyes. Saniwa ensidens is the only known jawed vertebrate to have had two eyelike photosensory structures at the top of the head, in addition to the organs we commonly think of as eyes, researchers report April 2 in Current Biology.

    The structures are called the pineal and parapineal...

    04/05/2018 - 12:19 Paleontology, Earth, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    Opioids kill. Here’s how an overdose shuts down your body

    03/29/2018 - 07:00 Health, Neuroscience, Biomedicine
  • News in Brief

    Brain waves of concertgoers sync up at shows

    BOSTON — Getting your groove on solo with headphones on might be your jam, but it can’t compare with a live concert. Just ask your brain. When people watch live music together, their brains waves synchronize, and this brain bonding is linked with having a better time.

    The new findings, reported March 27 at a Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting, are a reminder that humans are social...

    03/28/2018 - 13:30 Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Parents’ presence promotes a child’s pluck

    BOSTON — The bond between parent and child is powerful enough to override fear. New research shows that if a parent sits with a young child during a potentially scary situation, the child isn’t as afraid of it later.

    The study is in line with research suggesting that during particular stages of development, a strong connection with a caregiver tamps down activity in the amygdala, the...

    03/27/2018 - 18:30 Neuroscience
  • News

    When tickling the brain to stimulate memory, location matters

    BOSTON — Conflicting results on whether brain stimulation helps or hinders memory may be explained by the electrodes’ precise location: whether they’re tickling white matter or gray matter.

    New research on epilepsy patients suggests that stimulating a particular stretch of the brain’s white matter — tissue that transfers nerve signals around the brain — improves performance on memory...

    03/26/2018 - 18:03 Neuroscience
  • News

    Brain waves may focus attention and keep information flowing

    We can’t see it, but brains hum with electrical activity. Brain waves created by the coordinated firing of huge collections of nerve cells pinball around the brain. The waves can ricochet from the front of the brain to the back, or from deep structures all the way to the scalp and then back again.

    Called neuronal oscillations, these signals are known to accompany certain mental states....

    03/13/2018 - 13:00 Neuroscience
  • Reviews & Previews

    How biology breaks the ‘cerebral mystique’

    The Biological MindAlan JasanoffBasic Books, $30

    At a small eatery in Seville, Spain, Alan Jasanoff had his first experience with brains — wrapped in eggs and served with potatoes. At the time, he was more interested in finding a good, affordable meal than contemplating the sheer awesomeness of the organ he was eating. Years later, Jasanoff began studying the brain as part of his...

    03/12/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience, History of Science, Psychology
  • Feature

    Depression among new mothers is finally getting some attention

    On the hormonal roller coaster of life, the ups and downs of childbirth are the Tower of Power. For nine long months, a woman’s body and brain absorb a slow upwelling of hormones, notably progesterone and estrogen. The ovaries and placenta produce these two chemicals in a gradual but relentless rise to support the developing fetus.

    With the birth of a baby, and the immediate expulsion of...

    03/11/2018 - 05:00 Neuroscience, Mental Health