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E.g., 08/23/2017
E.g., 08/23/2017
Your search has returned 155 images:
  • black-legged tick on the left, lone star tick on the right
  • Streptococcus gallolyticus
  • flu virus
Your search has returned 183 articles:
  • Letters to the Editor

    Inquiries about the moon's twilight zone, and more reader feedback

    Locked up

    Simulations suggest that heat from an infant Earth, the sun and the moon could have vaporized the moon’s metals into a thick atmosphere, Lisa Grossman reported in “Metallic air may have swaddled moon” (SN: 8/5/17, p. 7). One way to test the idea would be to look for a ring of extra sodium in rocks around the moon’s twilight zone, where sodium snow would have accumulated. This zone...

    08/23/2017 - 16:00 Astronomy, Microbiology, Physics
  • News

    A new tool could one day improve Lyme disease diagnosis

    A new testing method can distinguish between early Lyme disease and a similar tick-borne illness, researchers report. The approach may one day lead to a reliable diagnostic test for Lyme, an illness that can be challenging to identify.

    Using patient blood serum samples, the test accurately discerned early Lyme disease from the similar southern tick‒associated rash illness, or STARI, up...

    08/16/2017 - 16:10 Biomedicine, Health, Microbiology
  • News

    These bacteria may egg on colon cancer

    A bad bacterium may make colon cancer worse.

    Streptococcus gallolyticus spurred growth of some colon cancer cells in lab dishes and in mice, researchers report July 13 in PLOS Pathogens. S. gallolyticus stimulates a biochemical chain reaction that scientists already knew is involved in the development of colon cancer, the researchers discovered.

    Bacteria had to be in direct contact...

    07/13/2017 - 14:26 Microbiology, Cancer
  • News

    Chronic flu patients could be an early warning system for future outbreaks

    People with weakened immune systems might help scientists get a jump on the flu virus.

    Some flu virus mutations popped up again and again in cancer patients with long-term infections, researchers report June 27 in eLife. And some of those mutations were the same as ones found in flu viruses circulating around the world a few years later, evolutionary virologist Jesse Bloom of the Fred...

    06/27/2017 - 16:46 Microbiology, Genetics
  • News

    Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteria

    View slideshow

    On the surface, bacteria may appear bland. But there’s more going on inside than meets the eye, new research is revealing.

    For many years, scientists thought that bacteria didn’t have internal structures and were basically “bags of enzymes,” says structural and cell biologist Martin Warren of the University of Kent in England.

    Now, one group of researchers has...

    06/22/2017 - 14:00 Microbiology
  • News

    New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygen

    Acting like miniature trees that soak up sunlight and release oxygen, photosynthetic bacteria injected into the heart may lighten the damage from heart attacks, a new study in rats suggests.

    When researchers injected the bacteria into rats’ hearts, the microbes restored oxygen to heart tissue after blood supply was cut off as in a heart attack, researchers at Stanford University report...

    06/14/2017 - 14:06 Biomedicine, Microbiology
  • Feature

    Live antibiotics use bacteria to kill bacteria

    The woman in her 70s was in trouble. What started as a broken leg led to an infection in her hip that hung on for two years and several hospital stays. At a Nevada hospital, doctors gave the woman seven different antibiotics, one after the other. The drugs did little to help her. Lab results showed that none of the 14 antibiotics available at the hospital could fight the infection, caused by...

    06/13/2017 - 10:49 Health, Microbiology, Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • News in Brief

    Choosing white or whole-grain bread may depend on what lives in your gut

    Whether standard white bread or an artisanal sourdough loaf is “healthier” depends on the microbes living in a person’s intestines, a new study suggests.

    Averaging results from 20 people who ate white and whole wheat sourdough bread for one week each, researchers found no difference in people’s response to the breads, which includes changes in blood sugar levels. But when researchers...

    06/06/2017 - 12:18 Nutrition, Microbiology
  • News

    New rules for cellular entry may aid antibiotic development

    Like entry to an exclusive nightclub, getting inside a gram-negative bacterial cell is no easy feat for chemical compounds. But now a secret handshake has been revealed: A new study lays out several rules to successfully cross the cells’ fortified exteriors, which could lead to the development of sorely needed antibiotics.

    “It’s a breakthrough,” says microbiologist Kim Lewis of...

    05/10/2017 - 13:00 Biomedicine, Microbiology
  • News

    Immune cells play surprising role in steady heartbeat

    Immune system cells may help your heart keep the beat. These cells, called macrophages, usually protect the body from invading pathogens. But a new study published April 20 in Cell shows that in mice, the immune cells help electricity flow between muscle cells to keep the organ pumping.

    Macrophages squeeze in between heart muscle cells, called cardiomyocytes. These muscle cells...

    04/20/2017 - 12:35 Cells, Microbiology