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E.g., 10/20/2017
E.g., 10/20/2017
Your search has returned 266 images:
  • Mt. Etna
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Your search has returned 978 articles:
  • News in Brief

    How volcanoes may have ended the dynasty of Ptolemy and Cleopatra

    A series of volcanic eruptions may have helped bring about the downfall of the last Egyptian dynasty 2,000 years ago.

    By suppressing the monsoons that swelled the Nile River each summer, triggering flooding that supported the region’s agriculture, the eruptions probably helped usher in an era of periodic revolts, researchers report online October 17 in Nature Communications. That...

    10/17/2017 - 15:54 Earth
  • News

    When the Larsen C ice shelf broke, it exposed a hidden world

    Teams of scientists are gearing up to race to the Antarctic Peninsula to find out what happens in the immediate aftermath of a massive ice calving event. In July, a Delaware-sized iceberg broke off from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf (SN: 8/5/17, p. 6). Now, several research groups aim to assess the stability of the remaining ice shelf, map the region’s seafloor and study a newly exposed...

    10/13/2017 - 13:33 Earth, Climate
  • News in Brief

    During El Niño, the tropics emit more carbon dioxide

    The tropics of Asia, Africa and South America all puffed out more carbon dioxide during the strong 2015–2016 El Niño than during the 2011 La Niña, new satellite data show. Because El Niño’s warmer, drier conditions in tropical regions mimic the effects of climate change expected by the end of the century, those observations may be a sobering harbinger of the tropics’ diminishing role as a...

    10/12/2017 - 14:09 Climate, Earth, Plants
  • Science Ticker

    Plate tectonics started at least 3.5 billion years ago

    Plate tectonics may have gotten a pretty early start in Earth’s history. Most estimates put the onset of when the large plates that make up the planet’s outer crust began shifting at around 3 billion years ago. But a new study in the Sept. 22 Science that analyzes titanium in continental rocks asserts that plate tectonics began 500 million years earlier. 

    Nicolas Greber, now at the...

    09/21/2017 - 15:12 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Plate tectonics started at least 3.5 billion years ago

    Most estimates put the onset of plate tectonics at around 3 billion years ago. But a new study in the Sept. 22 Science asserts that the large plates that make up Earth’s outer crust began shifting 500 million years earlier.

    Nicolas Greber of the University of Geneva and colleagues say previous studies got it wrong because scientists looked at silicon dioxide in shales, which bear the...

    09/21/2017 - 15:12 Earth
  • News

    Intense storms provide the first test of powerful new hurricane forecast tools

    This year’s Atlantic hurricane season has already proven to be active and deadly. Powerful hurricanes such as Harvey, Irma and Maria are also providing a testing ground for new tools that scientists hope will save lives by improving forecasts in various ways, from narrowing a storm’s future path to capturing swift changes in the intensity of storm winds.

    Some of the tools that debuted...

    09/21/2017 - 08:07 Earth, Climate
  • Science & the Public

    How hurricanes and other devastating disasters spur scientific research

    Every day, it seems like there’s a new natural disaster in the headlines. Hurricane Harvey inundates Texas. Hurricane Irma plows through the Caribbean and the U.S. south, and Jose is hot on its heels. A deadly 8.1-magnitude earthquake rocks Mexico. Wildfires blanket the western United States in choking smoke.

    While gripping tales of loss and heroism rightly fill the news, another story...

    09/12/2017 - 17:15 Earth, Oceans, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    North America’s largest recorded earthquake helped confirm plate tectonics

    The Great QuakeHenry FountainCrown, $28

    In the early evening of March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake roiled Alaska. For nearly five minutes, the ground shuddered violently in what was, and still is, the second biggest temblor in recorded history.

    Across the southern part of the state, land cracked and split, lifting some areas nearly 12 meters — about as high as a telephone...

    09/03/2017 - 08:00 Earth, History of Science
  • News

    On a mountain in Wyoming, the eclipse brings wonder — and, hopefully, answers

    View the video

    CASPER MOUNTAIN, Wyo. — It’s nothing like a sunset. It’s cold and dark, but it’s not like nighttime, or even twilight. The moon just snaps into place over the last slivers of the sun, turning the sun into a dark hole. The only illumination — a flat, ghostly, metallic sort of light — is from peaked gossamer streamers stretching out toward the edges of the sky.

    I’ve...

    08/21/2017 - 19:38 Astronomy, Earth
  • News

    Does the corona look different when solar activity is high versus when it’s low?

    Some cities have all the luck.

    Carbondale, Ill., is just a few kilometers north of the point where this year’s total solar eclipse will linger longest — the city will get two minutes and 38 seconds of total darkness when the moon blocks out the sun. And it’s the only city in the United States that will also be in the path of totality when the next total solar eclipse crosses North...

    08/19/2017 - 07:00 Astronomy, Physics, Science & Society, Earth