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E.g., 10/17/2017
E.g., 10/17/2017
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  • La Brea Tar Pits
Your search has returned 1913 articles:
  • News

    To understand the origins of pain, ask a flatworm

    Hydrogen peroxide, a molecule produced by cells under duress, may be a common danger signal, helping to alert animals to potential harm and send them scurrying. New details from planarian flatworms of how this process works may deepen scientists’ understanding of how people detect pain, and may ultimately point to better ways to curb it.

    “Being able to get a big-picture view of how these...

    10/16/2017 - 12:46 Animals, Neuroscience, Genetics
  • The Science Life

    Surgeon aims to diagnose deformities of extinct saber-toothed cats

    Robert Klapper has examined scores of damaged and diseased human knees, hips and shoulders. But a visit to the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum introduced the orthopedic surgeon to the suffering of an extinct cat — and a scientific mystery. In 2000, Klapper took a break from his patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles to visit the nearby tar pits, where myriad mammals and other...

    10/13/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    New deep-sea sponge could play a starring role in monitoring ocean health

    The deep waters of the East Pacific hold an unprepossessing treasure trove: potato-sized lumps of rock that contain valuable metals such as manganese, cobalt and copper. Turns out, such “manganese nodules” are home to another kind of goody: a species of sponge never before seen, researchers report online September 24 in Systematics and Biodiversity. These newly discovered nodule-dwellers may...

    10/10/2017 - 07:00 Animals, Oceans, Conservation
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient whale turns up on wrong side of the world

    A new discovery is turning the hemispheric history of a mysterious whale species upside-down. Two fossils recently unearthed in Italy and Japan suggest that a southern whale was briefly a denizen of northern waters more than half a million years ago.

    Until now, all available evidence suggested that the pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, and its ancestors have been steadfast Southern...

    10/09/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Paleontology
  • News

    Much of the world’s honey now contains bee-harming pesticides

    Neonicotinoid pesticides are turning up in honey on every continent with honeybees.

    The first global honey survey testing for these controversial nicotine-derived pesticides shows just how widely honeybees are exposed to the chemicals, which have been shown to affect the health of bees and other insects. Three out of four honey samples tested contained measurable levels of at least one...

    10/05/2017 - 14:06 Agriculture, Animals
  • Science Ticker

    A baby ichthyosaur’s last meal revealed

    As far as last meals go, squid isn’t a bad choice. Cephalopod remains appear to dominate the stomach contents of a newly analyzed ichthyosaur fossil from nearly 200 million years ago.

    The ancient marine reptiles once roamed Jurassic seas and commonly pop up in England’s fossil-rich coast near Lyme Regis. But a lot of ichthyosaur museum specimens lack records of where they came from,...

    10/03/2017 - 02:00 Paleontology, Animals
  • News in Brief

    Castaway critters rafted to U.S. shores aboard Japan tsunami debris

    The 2011 tsunami that devastated Japan’s coast cast an enormous amount of debris out to sea — way out. Japanese marine life took advantage of the new floating real estate and booked a one-way trip to America. From 2012 to 2017, at least 289 living Japanese marine species washed up on the shores of North America and Hawaii, hitching rides on fishing boats, docks, buoys, crates and other...

    09/28/2017 - 15:19 Oceans, Animals, Climate
  • Science Ticker

    Bedbugs may be into dirty laundry

    Common bedbugs have a thing for dirty laundry. New research suggests that in the absence of humans to latch onto, the bloodsuckers flock to clothing doused in that certain gym-bag je ne sais quoi.

    Bedbugs (Cimex lectularius) rely on a variety of sights, smells and changes in temperature as clues for the opportune moment to emerge from hiding and search for a blood meal. To investigate...

    09/28/2017 - 09:00 Animals
  • Science Ticker

    This giant marsupial was a seasonal migrant

    The largest marsupial to ever walk the Earth just got another accolade: It’s also the only marsupial known to migrate seasonally.

    Diprotodon optatum was a massive wombat-like herbivore that lived in what’s now Australia and New Guinea during the Pleistocene, until about 40,000 years ago. Now, an analysis of one animal’s teeth suggests that it undertook long, seasonal migrations like...

    09/26/2017 - 19:05 Paleontology, Animals
  • News

    To test sleep, researchers don’t let sleeping jellyfish lie

    View the video

    The life of a jellyfish may seem like a real snooze, but until now biologists were never certain if the gelatinous blobs actually slept. Now it appears that at least one group of jellyfish needs its beauty sleep just like us.

    Some species of upside-down jellyfish (Cassiopea) meet all of the criteria for entering a “sleeplike state,” a group of Caltech researchers...

    09/26/2017 - 16:52 Animals, Neuroscience