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E.g., 10/21/2017
E.g., 10/21/2017
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Your search has returned 523 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient whale turns up on wrong side of the world

    A new discovery is turning the hemispheric history of a mysterious whale species upside-down. Two fossils recently unearthed in Italy and Japan suggest that a southern whale was briefly a denizen of northern waters more than half a million years ago.

    Until now, all available evidence suggested that the pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, and its ancestors have been steadfast Southern...

    10/09/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Paleontology
  • Science Ticker

    A baby ichthyosaur’s last meal revealed

    As far as last meals go, squid isn’t a bad choice. Cephalopod remains appear to dominate the stomach contents of a newly analyzed ichthyosaur fossil from nearly 200 million years ago.

    The ancient marine reptiles once roamed Jurassic seas and commonly pop up in England’s fossil-rich coast near Lyme Regis. But a lot of ichthyosaur museum specimens lack records of where they came from,...

    10/03/2017 - 02:00 Paleontology, Animals
  • News in Brief

    A baby ichthyosaur’s last meal revealed

    As far as last meals go, squid isn’t a bad choice. Remains of a squidlike cephalopod appear to dominate the stomach contents of an almost 200-million-year-old ichthyosaur fossil.

    Ichthyosaur bones commonly pop up on England’s fossil-rich coast near Lyme Regis. But a lot of museum specimens lack records, making their age difficult to place. Dean Lomax of the University of Manchester in...

    10/03/2017 - 02:00 Paleontology, Animals
  • Science Ticker

    Saber-toothed kittens were born armed to pounce

    Saber-toothed kittens were the spitting image of their parents. Even as babies, the cats not only had the oversized canine teeth but also unusually powerful forelimbs, Katherine Long, a graduate student at California State Polytechnic University in Pomona, and colleagues report September 27 in PLOS ONE.

    As adults, the ferocious felines used those strong forelimbs to secure wriggling prey...

    09/27/2017 - 14:00 Paleontology
  • Science Ticker

    This giant marsupial was a seasonal migrant

    The largest marsupial to ever walk the Earth just got another accolade: It’s also the only marsupial known to migrate seasonally.

    Diprotodon optatum was a massive wombat-like herbivore that lived in what’s now Australia and New Guinea during the Pleistocene, until about 40,000 years ago. Now, an analysis of one animal’s teeth suggests that it undertook long, seasonal migrations like...

    09/26/2017 - 19:05 Paleontology, Animals
  • News

    Shhhh! Some plant-eating dinos snacked on crunchy critters

    Some dinosaurs liked to cheat on their vegetarian diet.

    Based on the shape of their teeth and jaws, large plant-eating dinosaurs are generally thought to have been exclusively herbivorous. But for one group of dinosaurs, roughly 75-million-year-old poop tells another story. Their fossilized droppings, or coprolites, contained tiny fragments of mollusk and other crustacean shells along...

    09/21/2017 - 09:00 Paleontology, Animals
  • Rethink

    3-D scans of fossils suggest new fish family tree

    When it comes to some oddball fish, looks can be deceiving.

    Polypterus, today found only in Africa, and its close kin have generally been considered some of the most primitive ray-finned fishes alive, thanks in part to skeletal features that resemble those on some ancient fish. Now a new analysis of fish fossils of an early polypterid relative called Fukangichthys unearthed in China...

    09/18/2017 - 14:17 Animals, Evolution, Paleontology
  • News

    Like sea stars, ancient echinoderms nibbled with tiny tube feet

    Sea stars and their relatives eat, breathe and scuttle around the seafloor with tiny tube feet. Now researchers have gotten their first-ever look at similar tentacle-like structures in an extinct group of these echinoderms.

    It was suspected that the ancient marine invertebrates, called edrioasteroids, had tube feet. But a set of unusually well-preserved fossils from around 430 million...

    09/12/2017 - 19:05 Paleontology, Animals
  • News

    Woolly rhinos may have grown strange extra ribs before going extinct

    As time ran out for the woolly rhino, strange things happened. Before going extinct, some of the beasts faced an unusually high risk of growing bizarre ribs in their neck, a new study suggests. Those misplaced ribs might have signaled the animals’ impending demise.

    Scientists examined neck bones from 32 woolly rhinos and found indented spots on five of them where ribs had once attached...

    09/07/2017 - 11:00 Paleontology, Evolution, Physiology
  • Introducing

    This ancient sea worm sported a crowd of ‘claws’ around its mouth

    View the video

    Predatory sea worms just aren’t as spiny as they used to be.

    These arrow worms, which make up the phylum Chaetognatha, snatch prey with Wolverine-like claws protruding from around their mouths. Researchers now report that a newly identified species of ancient arrow worm was especially heavily armed. Dubbed Capinatator praetermissus, the predator had about 50 curved...

    08/23/2017 - 11:00 Paleontology, Animals