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E.g., 12/11/2017
E.g., 12/11/2017
Your search has returned 275 images:
  • Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai
  • illustration of life in the Pliocene
  • Hurricane visualization
Your search has returned 987 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Watching this newborn island erode could tell us a lot about Mars

    NEW ORLEANS — Earth’s youngest bit of land is getting a new lease on life. When an erupting volcano birthed an island in the Pacific Ocean in late 2014, scientists thought waves would erode the island away within just a few months. Instead, new data suggest it could stick around for up to 30 years, researchers reported December 11 at a news conference at the American Geophysical Union’s fall...

    12/11/2017 - 17:48 Earth, Oceans, Planetary Science
  • Feature

    What the Pliocene epoch can teach us about future warming on Earth

    Imagine a world where the polar ice sheets are melting, sea level is rising and the atmosphere is stuffed with about 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide. Sound familiar? It should. We’re living it. But the description also matches Earth a little over 3 million years ago, in the middle of the geologic epoch known as the Pliocene.

    To understand how our planet might respond as global...

    11/28/2017 - 08:00 Earth, Climate
  • Science Visualized

    Watch NASA’s mesmerizing new visualization of the 2017 hurricane season

    View the video

    How do you observe the invisible currents of the atmosphere? By studying the swirling, billowing loads of sand, sea salt and smoke that winds carry. A new simulation created by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., reveals just how far around the globe such aerosol particles can fly on the wind.

    The complex new simulation, powered by...

    11/20/2017 - 07:00 Earth, Climate
  • Exhibit

    A new map exhibit documents evolving views of Earth’s interior

    Much of what happens on the Earth’s surface is connected to activity far below. “Beneath Our Feet,” a temporary exhibit at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center in the Boston Public Library, explores the ways people have envisioned, explored and exploited what lies underground.

    “We’re trying to visualize those places that humans don’t naturally go to,” says associate curator Stephanie Cyr...

    11/19/2017 - 07:00 History of Science, Earth
  • News in Brief

    Humans are driving climate change, federal scientists say

    It is “extremely likely” that humans are driving warming on Earth since the 1950s. That statement — which indicates a 95 to 100 percent confidence in the finding — came in a report released November 3 by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. This interagency effort was established in 1989 by presidential initiative to help inform national science policy.

    The 2017 Climate Science...

    11/03/2017 - 18:19 Climate, Earth
  • News in Brief

    Dino-dooming asteroid impact created a chilling sulfur cloud

    The asteroid collision that may have doomed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago really stank. A new analysis of gases released from vaporized rocks at the impact site in modern-day Mexico suggests that the smashup released up to three times more smelly, climate-cooling sulfur than previously believed.

    The Chicxulub impact spewed about 325 billion tons of sulfur and 425 billion tons of...

    11/02/2017 - 06:00 Earth, Planetary Science, Animals
  • News

    Wind may be driving the melting of East Antarctica’s largest glacier

    View the video

    The wind is helping to awaken one of Antarctica’s sleeping giants. Warm ocean waters, driven inland by winds, are undercutting an ice shelf that holds back a vast glacier from sliding into the ocean, researchers report November 1 in Science Advances.

    Totten Glacier is East Antarctica’s largest glacier, with a drainage basin encompassing about 550,000 square...

    11/01/2017 - 14:24 Earth, Climate, Oceans
  • News in Brief

    A deadly 2014 landslide’s power came from soils weakened by past slides

    SEATTLE — Earth weakened by previous landslides and soils behaving like water were responsible for the unusual size of a deadly 2014 landslide, two scientists reported October 24 at the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting. Understanding why this landslide was so mobile could help geologists better map the hazards that could lead to others like it and prevent future loss of life....

    10/27/2017 - 15:33 Earth
  • News

    As ice retreats, frozen mosses emerge to tell climate change tale

    SEATTLE — Some mosses in the eastern Canadian Arctic, long entombed in ice, are now emerging into the sunlight. And the radiocarbon ages of those plants suggest that summertime temperatures in the region are the warmest they’ve been in tens of thousands of years.

    As the planet warms and the ice retreats on Canada’s Baffin Island, the change is revealing plants long buried beneath the ice...

    10/26/2017 - 07:00 Climate, Earth, Plants
  • News in Brief

    How volcanoes may have ended the dynasty of Ptolemy and Cleopatra

    A series of volcanic eruptions may have helped bring about the downfall of the last Egyptian dynasty 2,000 years ago.

    By suppressing the monsoons that swelled the Nile River each summer, triggering flooding that supported the region’s agriculture, the eruptions probably helped usher in an era of periodic revolts, researchers report online October 17 in Nature Communications. That...

    10/17/2017 - 15:54 Earth