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  • Everglades from above
  • hurricane eye
  • child drinking
Your search has returned 1038 articles:
  • Feature

    A freshwater, saltwater tug-of-war is eating away at the Everglades

    The boardwalk at Pa-hay-okee Overlook is a brief, winding path into a dreamworld in Everglades National Park. Beyond the wooden slats, an expanse of gently waving saw grass stretches to the horizon, where it meets an iron-gray sky. Hardwood tree islands — patches of higher, drier ground called hammocks — rise up from the prairie like surfacing swimmers. The rhythmic singing of cricket frogs is...

    08/20/2018 - 09:00 Ecosystems, Earth
  • In 1968, scientists tried taming hurricanes

    Stormfury: Calming the Eyewall

    Since man cannot muster anything approaching the energy of a hurricane, and so has no hope of overcoming the storm by force, Stormfury attempts to use the giant’s own energy against it…. Last week, Project Stormfury began its 1968 season. — Science News, August 17, 1968.

    Update  

    The goal of the U.S. government’s Project Stormfury, which began in...

    08/16/2018 - 12:00 Earth, Climate
  • Feature

    More than 2 billion people lack safe drinking water. That number will only grow.

    Freshwater is crucial for drinking, washing, growing food, producing energy and just about every other aspect of modern life. Yet more than 2 billion of Earth’s 7.6 billion inhabitants lack clean drinking water at home, available on demand.

    A major United Nations report, released in June, shows that the world is not on track to meet a U.N. goal: to bring safe water and sanitation to...

    08/16/2018 - 07:00 Conservation, Climate, Earth
  • Feature

    Why sea level rise varies from place to place

    In the 20th century, ocean levels rose by a global average of about 14 centimeters, mainly due to melting ice and warming waters. Some coastal areas saw more sea level rise than others. Here’s why:  

    Expanding seawater

    As water heats up, its molecules take up more space, contributing to global sea level rise. Local weather systems can influence that effect. In 2017 scientists reported in...

    08/15/2018 - 09:30 Earth, Oceans, Climate
  • Editor's Note

    The trouble with water, be it too much or too little

    A year ago, while news reports focused on the inundation of Houston by Hurricane Harvey, much of the Indian city of Mumbai was also underwater. Both coastal cities, more than 14,000 kilometers apart, had been swamped by extreme rainfall. Deputy news editor Katy Daigle, who had reported from India for seven years for the Associated Press before joining Science News, knew that flooding...
    08/09/2018 - 07:15 Science & Society, Climate, Earth
  • News

    Global dimming may mitigate warming, but could hurt crop yields

    Shading Earth by adding a veil of particles to the upper atmosphere may help to offset global warming — but at a cost.

    Crop yields could decline, as they did following two colossal volcanic eruptions that shot sunlight-blocking sulfur particles high above the cloud layer and into the planet’s stratosphere, researchers report online August 8 in Nature. The study is the first to use real-...

    08/08/2018 - 13:32 Earth, Climate
  • News

    Rare blue diamonds are born deep in Earth’s mantle

    Blue diamonds, among the rarest gems on Earth, are born deep inside the planet’s mantle. Yet their blue hue comes from boron, an element far more abundant in Earth’s crust than its mantle. Using tiny flaws encased within the diamonds, scientists now think they’ve figured out how boron could have ended up at depths where the diamonds form: Subducting ocean plates carried the boron deep into...

    08/01/2018 - 13:00 Earth
  • News in Brief

    The giant iceberg that broke from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf is stuck

    Curl the fingers of your left hand over your palm and stick out your thumb like a hitchhiker. Now, you have a rough map of Antarctica — with the inside of your thumb playing the part of the Larsen C ice shelf, says glaciologist Ted Scambos of the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo.

    About a year ago, a massive iceberg roughly the size of Delaware broke off from that ice...

    07/23/2018 - 07:00 Earth, Oceans, Ecology
  • Say What?

    You’re living in a new geologic age. It’s called the Meghalayan

    Meghalayan\mehg-a-LAY-an \ n.

    The newly named current geologic age that started 4,200 years ago.

    Welcome to the Meghalayan, our geologic here and now. It’s one of three newly designated ages divvying up the Holocene Epoch, a geologic time period kicked off 11,700 years ago by the end of the Ice Age.

    First came a warming period, now dubbed the Greenlandian Age. Then, about 8,300...

    07/20/2018 - 07:00 Earth, Climate, Anthropology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ask about proton pressure, wearable tech and more

    Pressure gauge

    The pressure inside a proton is the highest of any known substance, Emily Conover reported in “The inside of a proton endures more pressure than anything else we’ve seen” (SN: 6/9/18, p. 10).

    “I don’t think it’s valid to think of pressure on a quantum level the same way we do classically,” Reddit user phazer6 wrote. Pressure relates to collections of particles, but “...

    07/11/2018 - 07:15 Particle Physics, Technology, Earth