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E.g., 04/22/2018
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Your search has returned 219 articles:
  • News

    Masses of shrimp and krill may play a huge role in mixing oceans

    When it comes to tiny ocean swimmers, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts. Ocean turbulence stirred up by multitudes of creatures such as krill can be powerful enough to extend hundreds of meters down into the deep, a new study suggests.

    Brine shrimp moving vertically in two different laboratory tanks created small eddies that aggregated into a jet roughly the size of the...

    04/18/2018 - 13:20 Oceans, Ecology
  • News

    Cargo ships must cut their emissions in half by 2050

    A new, hard-fought international deal will set limits on greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping for the first time.

    Delegates to the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization, or IMO, met for a week in London to hash out the details of the plan. On April 13, more than 170 states agreed to the new road map, which aims to reduce shipping emissions at least 50...

    04/13/2018 - 17:47 Climate, Oceans
  • Science Stats

    Ocean heat waves are becoming more common and lasting longer

    The world’s oceans are sweltering. Over the last century, marine heat waves have become more common and are lasting longer. New research suggests the annual number of days that some part of the ocean is experiencing a heat wave has increased 54 percent from 1925 to 2016, researchers report April 10 in Nature Communications.

    Typically, scientists define a marine heat wave as at least five...

    04/10/2018 - 11:00 Oceans, Climate
  • News

    Microplastics may enter freshwater and soil via compost

    Composting waste is heralded as being good for the environment. But it turns out that compost collected from homes and grocery stores is a previously unknown source of microplastic pollution, a new study April 4 in Science Advances reports.

    This plastic gets spread over fields, where it may be eaten by worms and enter the food web, make its way into waterways or perhaps break down...

    04/05/2018 - 16:17 Pollution, Oceans
  • News

    Seafloor map shows why Greenland’s glaciers melt at different rates

    Greenland is melting rapidly, but some glaciers are disappearing faster than others. A new map of the surrounding seafloor helps explain why: Many of the fastest-melting glaciers sit atop deep fjords that allow Atlantic Ocean water to melt them from below.

    Researchers led by glaciologist Romain Millan of the University of California, Irvine analyzed new oceanographic and topographic data...

    04/03/2018 - 13:02 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • The Science Life

    Humpback whale bumps have marine biologists stumped

    Off the Kohala coast on the Big Island of Hawaii, Christine Gabriele spots whale 875. The familiar propeller scar on its left side and the shape of its dorsal fin are like a telltale fingerprint. Gabriele, a marine biologist with the Hawaii Marine Mammal Consortium, confirms the whale’s identity against her extensive photo catalog. Both Gabriele and this male humpback have migrated to this...

    03/26/2018 - 13:56 Animals, Pollution, Oceans
  • Science Stats

    The great Pacific garbage patch may be 16 times as massive as we thought

    We’re going to need a bigger trash can.

    A pooling of plastic waste floating in the ocean between California and Hawaii contains at least 79,000 tons of material spread over 1.6 million square kilometers, researchers report March 22 in Scientific Reports. That’s the equivalent to the mass of more than 6,500 school buses. Known as the great Pacific garbage patch, the hoard is four to 16...

    03/22/2018 - 10:00 Pollution, Oceans
  • News

    Pollution regulations help Chesapeake Bay seagrass rebound

    Underwater grasses are growing back in the Chesapeake Bay. The plants now carpet three times as much real estate as in 1984, thanks to more than 30 years of efforts to reduce nitrogen pollution. This environmental success story shows that regulations put in place to protect the bay’s health have made a difference, researchers report the week of March 5 in Proceedings of the National Academy of...

    03/05/2018 - 15:00 Ecosystems, Oceans, Plants
  • Science Stats

    By 2100, damaged corals may let waves twice as tall as today’s reach coasts

    A complex coral reef full of nooks and crannies is a coastline’s best defense against large ocean waves. But coral die-offs over the next century could allow taller waves to penetrate the corals’ defenses, simulations suggest. A new study finds that at some Pacific Island sites, waves reaching the shore could be more than twice as high as today’s by 2100.

    The rough, complex structures of...

    03/05/2018 - 13:41 Earth, Oceans, Animals
  • News in Brief

    Plastic pollution increases risk of devastating disease in corals

    View the video

    Coral reefs are sick of plastic.

    More than 11 billion plastic objects are polluting Asia-Pacific coral reefs, a new estimate finds. This waste can harbor pathogenic bacteria known to make corals sick. Reefs littered with plastic were at least 20 times as likely to have diseased corals as unpolluted reefs, researchers say. 

    Corals succumbing to disease can throw...

    01/25/2018 - 17:00 Pollution, Oceans, Ecosystems